Bullying: Prevalence & Resources: In Each State There Is a Parent Training and Information (PTI) Center Which Provides Technical Assistance to Families as Well as Professionals. PTIs Provide Information about the Rights of the Students and the Responsibilities of the Districts

By Agoratus, Lauren | The Exceptional Parent, September 2014 | Go to article overview

Bullying: Prevalence & Resources: In Each State There Is a Parent Training and Information (PTI) Center Which Provides Technical Assistance to Families as Well as Professionals. PTIs Provide Information about the Rights of the Students and the Responsibilities of the Districts


Agoratus, Lauren, The Exceptional Parent


Research shows that children with disabilities are even more likely to be the victims of bullying than their peers without special needs. Special initiatives have been created to address this issue. Families and professionals need to know that both the victim and bully need help.

PREVALENCE

The rate of bullying for was almost 25 percent in elementary school, and up to 34.1 percent in middle school. (i) Almost half of children with autism are subjected to bullying. (ii) Research shows that students with any kind of disability are two to three times more likely to be bullied than their non-disabled peers. (iii)

ANTI-BULLYING PROGRAMS

Stop Bullying Now: The U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources has a website called Stop Bullying Now. They recognized that bullying was a systemic issue affecting all children that needed to be addressed. The website has tips on defining bullying, including cyberbullying, how to prevent it, what to do when it happens, and where to get help. There is also an interactive map where families and professionals can find the applicable laws in their state. The information is available in both English and Spanish.

Perhaps the best feature of the site is a special section for children themselves. This section has facts about bullying, what kids can do about it, instructional videos, and fun games. This is especially important as research has shown that over half the time bullying stops immediately if a bystander intervenes, even if it is another child. (iv) This section of the website has four colorful buttons to links that are easy for children to use. The only downside is that, unfortunately, the section for children is only available in English.

Violence Prevention Works! Home of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program: It is important that schools use an effective bullying prevention and intervention program if they are going to reduce or stop bullying. The Olweus Bullying Prevention Program is an evidence-based intervention that has worked not only in the US but across the world. The Violence Prevention Works! Website has tips for administrators, teachers, and parents (in English and Spanish) on recognizing bullying, the warning signs of bullying, the impact of bullying, cyber-bullying, what to do when witnessing bullying, and how to advocate for a bullying prevention program at your school.

Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports Center: The National Center for Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, funded by the US Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs, has a wealth of resources on bullying prevention including a manual and tools in English, Spanish and French focused on reducing bullying behavior through the use school-wide positive behavioral supports.

Stomp Out Bullying: Stomp Out Bullying is a website targeted to kids and teens. Its motto is Stop the Drama. End the Hate. Stomp out Bullying! There's a help chat line for children who are being bullied, a blog, and pages for administrators, educators, and parents. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Bullying: Prevalence & Resources: In Each State There Is a Parent Training and Information (PTI) Center Which Provides Technical Assistance to Families as Well as Professionals. PTIs Provide Information about the Rights of the Students and the Responsibilities of the Districts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.