Party Leaders Must Get Set to Pay for Those Promises. Today's No Vote Settled the Scottish Question -- but It Is Just the Start of a New Round of Heated Arguments. as Joe Murphy and Joseph Watts Report, a Price Must Be Paid for the Promises Made by Cameron, Miliband and Clegg to Keep Scotland in the UK

The Evening Standard (London, England), September 19, 2014 | Go to article overview

Party Leaders Must Get Set to Pay for Those Promises. Today's No Vote Settled the Scottish Question -- but It Is Just the Start of a New Round of Heated Arguments. as Joe Murphy and Joseph Watts Report, a Price Must Be Paid for the Promises Made by Cameron, Miliband and Clegg to Keep Scotland in the UK


Byline: Joe Murphy Joseph Watts

WEST LOTHIAN QUESTION

THE anomaly that allows 59 Scottish MPs to vote on English issues while English MPs cannot vote on matters devolved to Scotland is the most intractable issue stemming from today's No vote.

It gets its name from a question posed in the Commons in 1977 by Labour MP Tam Dalyell in a debate about Scottish and Welsh devolution: "For how long will English constituencies and English Honourable Members tolerate at least 119 Honourable Members from Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland exercising an important, and probably often decisive, effect on English politics while they themselves have no say in the same matters in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland?"

The question has simmered away for nearly 40 years without being answered, even when Westminster ceded swathes of policy powers to the new Scottish parliament, Holyrood, in 1999. After Gordon Brown rescued the No campaign by promising even more powers for Holyrood, the issue began to boil up. David Cameron said it was "more pressing" while Nick Clegg called it "simply unfair".

One answer might be for Scots MPs to give up, or be stripped of, their right to vote on English issues. But sources close to Ed Miliband say there is no deal on the horizon. "We are against having two classes of MPs, simple as that," one said.

Labour boasts 41 of the Scottish MPs, and their votes can make and sometimes break Westminster Bills that affect, say, the NHS for England and Wales.

Mr Cameron now senses a chance to turn English rights into a general election issue. A by-product could be the chance for London to negotiate its own settlement, such as keeping property tax revenues for future investment.

Experts say 21 Commons votes since 1997 would have gone differently if Scottish MPs' votes had not been counted, including the motion on intervening in Syria lost in 2013.

TAXATION

AT the heart of Better Together's campaign was a vow that all three big parties at Westminster backed major new tax-raising powers for the Scottish Parliament. But there is no agreement yet on what these powers will actually amount to.

The 2012 Scotland Act already gives Holyrood power to vary the income tax rate by up to 10p in the pound. Labour wants a modest extension to 15p, plus the restoration of the 50p rate for top earners. It would be worth PS2 billion more for the Scottish executive. But Holyrood would have no extra say over corporation tax, national insurance, VAT or capital gains tax.

The Tories and Lib-Dems would give Scotland total control over income tax rates, and possibly a say on VAT -- but not corporation tax. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Party Leaders Must Get Set to Pay for Those Promises. Today's No Vote Settled the Scottish Question -- but It Is Just the Start of a New Round of Heated Arguments. as Joe Murphy and Joseph Watts Report, a Price Must Be Paid for the Promises Made by Cameron, Miliband and Clegg to Keep Scotland in the UK
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.