Validation of Sexual Functioning Questionnaire in Indian Patients

By Krishna, Kodakandla; Avasthi, Ajit et al. | Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine, October-December 2014 | Go to article overview

Validation of Sexual Functioning Questionnaire in Indian Patients


Krishna, Kodakandla, Avasthi, Ajit, Grover, Sandeep, Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine


Byline: Kodakandla. Krishna, Ajit. Avasthi, Sandeep. Grover

Objective: To establish norms for sexual functioning questionnaire (SFQ) in Indian population. Materials and Methods: 100 male subjects, diagnosed with depressive disorder and currently in a state of clinical remission for a period of at least 4 weeks were evaluated on SFQ and Arizona Sexual Experience Questionnaire (ASEX). Result: By using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves a score of 14 was considered to be a cutoff for sexual dysfunction as per SFQ. This cutoff yielded a sensitivity of 91.7% and specificity of 86.4% for the detection of sexual dysfunction. The PPV of the instrument at this cutoff was 87%. Conclusion: A cutoff of 14 should be used to define sexual dysfunction as per SFQ.

Introduction

Sexual dysfunction is quite common in community as well as among the patients attending the clinics. Large epidemiological surveys of community samples from the United States have reported that more than 40% of women and 30% of men suffer from some form of sexual dysfunction, with low sexual desire in women (22%) and premature ejaculation in men (21%) being the most prevalent. [sup][1] An analysis of sexual dysfunction across eight European countries revealed that up to 34% of women and 15% of men report low sexual desire. [sup][2]

One of the major problems in the research on sexual dysfunction is lack of standardized instruments. Some studies have assessed sexual dysfunction by using spontaneous reporting or open questions that may be interpreted differently by different patients; hence, the findings may not be reliable. [sup][3],[4] Some studies have used inconsistent and unvalidated measures of sexual dysfunction. [sup][5],[6] In recent times, due to the constant efforts of various researchers, many scales such as Arizona Sexual Experience Questionnaire (ASEX), [sup][7] Brief Male Sexual Functioning Inventory (BMFSI), [sup][8] International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), [sup][9] Sexual Function Questionnaire (SFQ), [sup][10] and Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (CSFQ) [sup][11] etc. have been designed and validated to assess the different domains of sexual functioning. Still certain problems persist in using these questionnaires, such as lack of coverage of all the domains of sexual functioning. ASEX [sup][7] measures quality of sexual functioning in terms of five questions, each representing one domain: Drive, arousal, penile erection/vaginal lubrication, ability to reach orgasm, and satisfaction from orgasm. However, retarded ejaculation is difficult to evaluate when the subjects are assessed on ASEX. One of the most limiting factors in using these questionnaires is lack of cross-cultural validity; hence, there is a need to validate these questionnaires across cultures and establish the normative values.

SFQ [sup][10] is a scale to measure sexual dysfunction, which allows assessment of sexual function in the domains of libido, arousal (erection in men, vaginal lubrication in women), masturbation, orgasm (including dyspareunia), and ejaculation. The scale was specifically designed to assess sexual functioning of patients with severe mental disorders and can be used to evaluate physical sexual experience irrespective of whether the patient is in a relationship or not. The questions are worded in such a way that these are direct 'true/false' questions regarding concrete aspects of sexual functioning, assessing various domains of sexual functioning. Although two previous studies [sup][12],[13] used this scale in India, these studies have not validated the scale in Indian population. Even while describing the original scale, authors used arbitrary cutoff of one standard deviation above the mean values to define the presence of sexual dysfunction. [sup][10]

In this background, this study attempted to establish norms for SFQ in Indian population by using ASEX as a reference scale. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Validation of Sexual Functioning Questionnaire in Indian Patients
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.