Advanced Screencasting with Embedded Assessments in Pathophysiology and Therapeutics Course Modules

By Woodruff, Ashley E.; Jensen, Megan et al. | American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, August 14, 2014 | Go to article overview

Advanced Screencasting with Embedded Assessments in Pathophysiology and Therapeutics Course Modules


Woodruff, Ashley E., Jensen, Megan, Loeffler, William, Avery, Lisa, American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education


INTRODUCTION

The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education has promoted active learning to enhance pharmacy students' development of critical-thinking and problemsolving skills. (1) In a national survey of US colleges and schools of pharmacy, 87% of respondents reported using active-learning strategies in their classroom activities. (2) As active-learning strategies have been encouraged, the incorporation of technology to enhance student learning has gained widespread use in pharmacy education. (3) In fact, students have reported using technologies such as electronic course materials, digital lecture recordings, and handheld devices more often than traditional course textbooks. (4) A hybrid course uses a combination of face-to-face and online instruction to increase time spent on active-learning activities. This teaching strategy has been well received by students, with increased student preparation for in-class discussion and improved test performance. (5-10)

Screencasting is a type of e-lecture that incorporates digital recording of computer screen actions with dubbed audio narration. For example, an instructor can record voice-over narration for Powerpoint slides to create an e-lecture that can be posted in a video format for students to view. (11) We define advanced screencasting as the incorporation of digital recording, narration, interactivity, and metrics into an e-lecture format. E-lectures allow students to stop, restart, replay, and skip sections, allowing them to progress at their own pace according to their individual learning needs as they watch concepts, ideas, and calculations evolve in a stepwise fashion. Assessment questions are embedded within e-lectures to provide students immediate feedback on their understanding of the topic. The instructor can monitor students' time spent viewing the e-lectures and their achievement on embedded assessment questions to gain valuable preclass assessment data.

Pathophysiology and therapeutics courses require integration of newly learned information regarding complex disease states and corresponding pharmacotherapy. Additionally, many pathophysiology and therapeutics courses incorporate a problem-based learning (PBL) model whereby students apply newly learned material to a patient case in a clinical scenario to further enhance their understanding of the topic. (12,13) The tasks required in a pathophysiology and therapeutics course are complex, and a traditional lecture learning model may not suit every ability level and learning style.

The primary objective of this study was to compare students' test performance before and after the creation of pathophysiology and therapeutics course modules using advanced screencasting with embedded assessments. Secondary analysis included performance on test questions stratifiedby Bloom's taxonomy, student satisfaction with the use of e-lecture technology, and the length of time students spent completing the e-lectures. We hypothesized that implementing a hybrid learning model that used advanced screencasting e-lectures with embedded opportunities for self-assessment would improve examination scores and facilitate students' progression to higher cognitive domains of Bloom's taxonomy, such as application and synthesis.

DESIGN

This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at St. John Fisher College and was conducted at Wegmans School of Pharmacy (WSOP). Informed consent was not required, but a section was added to the course syllabus outlining the addition of e-lectures and surveys to the course to evaluate students' preference for this technology as part of this study. Two modules in the Pathophysiology and Therapeutics IV course in 2013, viral hepatitis and clinical pharmacokinetics of aminoglycosides, were selected for this study. At WSOP, clinical pharmacokinetic content is integrated within the pathophysiology and therapeutics curriculum. Pathophysiology and therapeutics IV was the final course in a 4-semester sequence and was taught in the spring semester of the third year of the doctor of pharmacy program. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Advanced Screencasting with Embedded Assessments in Pathophysiology and Therapeutics Course Modules
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.