THIS GIRL'S GOING PLACES; Rosamund Pike's Transformation into the Brittle but Viciously Manipulative Gone Girl Shows This Low-Key Actress Is Finally Ready to Bloom into a Hollywood Superstar

Daily Mail (London), October 3, 2014 | Go to article overview

THIS GIRL'S GOING PLACES; Rosamund Pike's Transformation into the Brittle but Viciously Manipulative Gone Girl Shows This Low-Key Actress Is Finally Ready to Bloom into a Hollywood Superstar


Byline: Reviews by Brian Viner

Reviews by Brian Viner Gone Girl (16)

Verdict: Grippingly dark adaptation ****

MILLIONS of people, having read Gillian Flynn's best-selling psychological thriller, already know the story of Nick and Amy Dunne, a handsome couple living in the American Midwest whose marriage has started to implode before she goes missing on their fifth wedding anniversary.

David Fincher's unrelentingly tense and sometimes disturbingly violent adaptation pulls off a considerable trick: it will grip those who have read the book as much as it does those who haven't.

The story, from a script by Flynn herself, begins with Nick (Ben Affleck) returning to their small-town Missouri home to find a coffee table overturned and signs of a violent struggle. Amy (Rosamund Pike) has disappeared, and the police, quickly on the scene, find specks of her blood.

Detective Boney (nicely played by Kim Dickens) is smart, but not quite smart enough, and we, the audience, are kept one step ahead of her thanks to extracts from Amy's diaries and a series of flashbacks, which show that a union founded on sizzling mutual attraction -- 'we're so cute I want to punch us in the face', she once declared, smugly -- has begun to founder on acidic mutual disdain.

External circumstances haven't helped. They were prosperous Manhattanites until Nick lost his job as a magazine journalist and Amy's trust fund, started by her writer parents with the substantial proceeds from a series of wildly popular children's books she inspired called Amazing Amy, started to dwindle.

They then left New York and returned to Nick's more rural home town, where his mother was dying. But Amy can't settle there. Beautiful and seemingly poised, just as America would expect of the grown-up Amazing Amy, she seethes inwardly with recriminations and boredom.

Nick, too, seems outwardly content. With his twin sister Margo (Carrie Coon) he runs a bar that Amy helped him buy with the last of her trust-fund money. But he burns with resentment.

At one level, the film is a forensic study of how any relationship, especially one oundations, can evel, it is a straight with a slow build of d Hitchcock would, there are manifest ynn's screenplay. g-person mystery in hen it becomes clear e involves the former dia circus descends d certainly not have with inadequate f crumble. At another leforward thriller, but wforeboding that Alfred Have admired. Indeed, echoes of Psycho in FlyBut this is a missing the information age. Whthat the disappearance Amazing Amy, a med that Hitchcock would recognised. Even before he is charged, Nick is subjected to trial by live, rolling television. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

THIS GIRL'S GOING PLACES; Rosamund Pike's Transformation into the Brittle but Viciously Manipulative Gone Girl Shows This Low-Key Actress Is Finally Ready to Bloom into a Hollywood Superstar
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.