Blood Sacrifices Are Passe-The God of London Property Demands the Offering of a Digger

By Smith, Ed | New Statesman (1996), May 30, 2014 | Go to article overview

Blood Sacrifices Are Passe-The God of London Property Demands the Offering of a Digger


Smith, Ed, New Statesman (1996)


I've made a discovery about what is buried under the swimming pools and basement conversions of wealthy west London. This booty is worth about 501 [pounds sterling]. More revealing, however, is another fact: this 5m [pounds sterling] was tossed away like small change tipped into a busker's hat. It is not Nazi art, or plutonium that has been used to kill the enemies of Russian oligarchs. It is a fleet of diggers.

Beginning in the 1990s, buyers of London's most expensive addresses began to feel a little hemmed in, even claustrophobic, inside their houses. Where could one take a swim, for example? Or watch a film on a cinema-size screen? Obviously, the idea of leaving the house to pursue such pastimes--and thus engaging with the human colour and spectacle that were once considered inextricably bound up with living in a city--was too ghastly to countenance. No, all pleasures had to be brought within the boundaries of one's house, thus protecting the owner from the dangers of face-to-face interaction with normal civilians.

So, many of the squares of the capital's super-prime real estate, from Belgravia and Chelsea to Mayfair and Notting Hill, have been reconfigured house by house. Given that London's strict planning rules restrict building upwards, digging downwards has been the solution for owners who want to expand their property's square-footage.

The challenge of adding new subterranean floors to London houses has become a highly lucrative business. The heavy lifting--or, in this case, the heavy digging--is usually contracted out to basement-conversion specialists. These firms discovered that it was reasonably easy to get a small digger (occasionally two) into the rear garden of a house on an exclusive 19th-century square. Sometimes they simply knock a hole in the wall and drive the diggers straight through the house. In other cases, the windows are so large that a digger can squeeze through without dismantling the bricks and mortar.

The difficulty is in getting the digger out again. To construct a no-expense-spared new basement, the digger has to go so deep into the London earth that it is unable to drive out again. What could be done?

Initially, the developers would often use a large crane to scoop up the digger, which was by now nestled almost out of sight at the bottom of a deep hole. Then they began to calculate the cost-benefit equation of this procedure. First, a crane would have to be hired; second, the entire street would need to be closed for a day while the crane was manoeuvred into place. Both of these stages were very expensive, not to mention unpopular among the distinguished local residents.

A new solution emerged: simply bury the digger in its own hole. Given the exceptional profits of London property development, why bother with the expense and hassle of retrieving a used digger--worth only 5,000 [pounds sterling] or 6,000 [pounds sterling]--from the back of a house that would soon be sold for several million? …

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