Terribly British Top 10s; CELEBRATING QUIRKS THAT MAKE US SPECIAL

The Mirror (London, England), October 8, 2014 | Go to article overview

Terribly British Top 10s; CELEBRATING QUIRKS THAT MAKE US SPECIAL


Byline: ROD MCPHEE

This green and pleasant land may be home to rolling hills, warm beer and cricket, but it's also full of bizarre, hilarious and silly quirks that make Britain so, well, British.

Did you know that there's a London shop flogging fridges called Sellfridges? Did you know there's a County Durham village called Pity Me?All these obscure facts have been brought together by writer John Rentoul in his new book Listel-lany: A Miscellany of very British Top Tens, which proves we can not only laugh at ourselves, but, in the case of daft car names, silly foreigners too.

Here's a selection of the best Top Tens in the new book...

Listellany: A Miscellany of Very British Top Tens: From Politics to Pop by John Rentoul is published tomorrow by Elliott & Thompson, price PS9.99.

rod.mcphee@mirror.co.uk

Most English Remarks Of All Time

1 I am just going outside and may be some time. - Antarctic explorer Captain Oates, inset, as he sacrificed his own life to save his comrades.

2 I think it's easing. (of the rain).

3 Old maids hiking to Holy Commun-ion through the mists of the autumn morning. - George Orwell, England Your England.

4 Who you looking at, mate? (usually in a pub).

5 Sorry.

6 By God, sir, I've lost my leg! By God, sir, so you have! - Lord Uxbridge and the Duke of Wellington at the battle of Waterloo.

7 Why don't you fall into two very lovely lines? - Sergeant Wilson, Dad's Army.

8 Well, you know me, I ain't one to gossip. - Dot Cotton, EastEnders.

9 It looked a tad sticky at Dunkirk. - Eddie Cozens, nominated by his grandson Mark Wallace, who had asked, "Did you ever think we might lose the war?"

10 Crashed slowrolling near the ground. Bad show. - Douglas Bader's logbook on the accident that cost him his legs.

Best British Place Names

1 Splott in Cardiff (above).

2 Pity Me County Durham.

3 Bat & Ball railway station in Sevenoaks, Kent.

4 Bufflers Holt Buckinghamshire.

5 Warninglid West Sussex.

6 Fingringhoe Essex.

7 Grimness Orkney.

8 No Place also in County Durham.

9 Ventongimps hamlet in Cornwall.

10 Snodland Kent.

Stupid car names

1 Renault Twingo

2 Mitsubishi Colt Starion

3 Kia cee'd

4 Mazda Bongo Friendee

5 Nissan Cedric

6 Dacia Duster

7 Mitsubishi Carisma Car.

8 Hyundai Getz

9 Ford Ka

10 VW up!

Great unremarked changes of our lifetime

1 Duvets replacing sheets and blankets in the 1970s

2 Nobody phones mum and dad with three rings any more

3 Rolling luggage

4 Street design - getting rid of pedestrian railings, mostly.

5 Wine used to be only occasional, sweet and in tiny glasses. …

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