No Wonder Rosamund Pike Says Marriage Is Over-Rated; Hit Film Gone Girl Has Made Her a Superstar. but after Her Train Wreck of a Love Life

Daily Mail (London), October 11, 2014 | Go to article overview

No Wonder Rosamund Pike Says Marriage Is Over-Rated; Hit Film Gone Girl Has Made Her a Superstar. but after Her Train Wreck of a Love Life


Byline: Geoffrey Levy

ONE is entitled to wonder what she really thinks you know, deep down inside. Publicity quotes may be the natural accessory of every new film, even one as acclaimed as the thriller Gone Girl, but it must have taken a great act of will for its star, Rosamund Pike, to talk openly over the past week about marriage.

Gone Girl is the story of an unhappily married young woman who goes missing, leaving her husband (played by Ben Affleck) accused of murder. Yet compared with the dramas of Rosamund's own life, that's a pretty straightforward plot.

Her past has all the ingredients for a blockbuster. It is the story of a beautiful English girl, educated privately and at Oxford, whose marriage dreams are twice destroyed in unique circumstances.

She first falls in love with a man who, after two intimate years, realises he is gay and now lives with a civil partner.

In the second reel, she falls in love with another man, they get engaged and buy a house. But when unknown to him, apparently she sends out 'save the date' prewedding cards to dozens of friends with a 'tasteful' picture of them in a hot tub, he is so appalled that he summarily dumps her.

This public humiliation is all the more puzzling as it befell a former Bond girl who has evolved into what the Mail's theatre critic Quentin Letts describes as 'one of the great beauties of our age'.

Not surprisingly, after such emotional blows, Rosamund Pike remains unmarried at 35. So it was telling when she said in an interview with Spectrum magazine that 'people have ridiculous expectations of a mate'. She continued: 'In my grandmother's day, you wouldn't expect your husband to fulfil the same need in you as your sister, or girlfriends, or colleagues at work.' She then argued that it is not 'universally achievable' for just one person to meet all your needs.

After the disasters of two great loves, Rosamund now shares her life with former heroin addict and City businessman Robie Uniacke. He is a big, rather shambolic Old Etonian who is not only 18 years her senior but had two failed marriages behind him and four children when they met in 2010. Today they have a son, Solo, two, and she is expecting their second child.

Rosamund's first love was actor Simon Woods, who, like Robie, was at Eton. He and Rosamund met and fell in love at Oxford, where both were studying English Literature. He was much envied by fellow undergraduates for having captured one of the most stunning girls at Oxford, and for two years she and handsome, charming Woods were inseparable.

But Simon had a secret. Unknown to Rosamund, he was beginning to doubt his sexuality. Eventually, he had to tell her.

How long he had known, he has never said. But how ironic for his admission to emerge just as Rosamund was being bedded on screen by James Bond she had been cast as icy double agent Miranda Frost alongside Pierce Brosnan in Die Another Day. Instead of marrying, they parted.

When Simon fell in love again, it was with a man. Two years ago nine years after his break-up with Rosamund he and his long-time partner, Burberry's creative director Christopher Bailey, tied the knot in a civil ceremony at Chelsea register office. 'Bond girl's ex weds his man,' said one headline.

Rosamund, who had remained a friend and been taught good manners as the only child of opera-singer parents and as a boarder at 214-year-old Badminton School in Bristol, sent them her good wishes.

Piquantly, she and Simon had already been reunited as lovers, albeit as the actors cast as Jane Bennet and Charles Bingley in the award-winning film of Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice.

Three years after they parted, they had been brought together for the roles in 2005 by the very man who was to break Rosamund's heart for a second time, the film's director Joe Wright. At the time, Joe and Rosamund had been together for more than a year. …

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