Essays on Faith and Believing

Manila Bulletin, October 14, 2014 | Go to article overview

Essays on Faith and Believing


Asuncion David Maramba says her latest book, Towards Adult Faith, which was launched last week before a group of admirers former batchmates in several schools where she obtained a seamless Catholic education, nuns of the ICM, fellow writers, social activists, and street parliamentarians during martial law, relatives, and friends, may be her last. However, we hope that she would continue using the media in making us aware of the many complex issues and the necessity for change in our beliefs, practices, and structures. She had raised many challenges needing urgent attention. And indeed, she is one of the few informed and credible voices that can ably speak about these issues. Her life as a scholar, professor of literature and theology and columnist for several publications had been a continuing search, a spiritual journey. She describes it as feeling cramped in a climate of insularity that she eventually summoned the courage to walk out of the box. In our fast-changing world, where there is constant questioning about the relevance of existing institutions, Sony Maramba adds her voice when she raises questions such as: Has the Church delved into the maze of this confounding, multi-cultural, violent, pluralistic, technological, consumerist, wretched and wealthy, environmentally challenged world? Or is she oversimplifying the challenge, reverting to railing against the old whipping dogs of materialism, secularism, modernism, and now, a new pantheism tinged with neo-paganism? In this 216-page volume, the 126 essays have been organized in 10 chapters Chapter I, Walking out of the Box, has intriguing titles Traveling Light and Free, Spiritual But Not Religious; and Toast To Conscience. In the latter, she thanks God for the temperate voice of Cardinal Tagle who says that bishops should have to be clear in their own theological positions, not just simply use authority as in the case of the RH battle where the local Church has taken a condemning stance. The other essays are classified under II, Acts of Faith; III, We Can Handle Ourselves; IV, The Institutional Church, Ruling and Commanding; V, Priest, Prelate, Pope; VI, Liturgy, Beyond Ritual and Royalty; VII, Church and State; VIII, Another Round for the Laity; IX, Reactions as a Pulse of the Faithful; and X, On the Cusp of Change. …

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