Beauty in the Baltic; ANGELA WORMALD Discovers the Delights of Russia and Scandinavia on Her First Cruise

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), October 18, 2014 | Go to article overview

Beauty in the Baltic; ANGELA WORMALD Discovers the Delights of Russia and Scandinavia on Her First Cruise


TEAKS and sleep were in order before a whirlwind two-day discovery of the wonders of St Petersburg.

SThe fabulous feast came courtesy of the Crown Grill speciality restaurant - the restful night was in our comfortable cabin on the Royal Princess, 'Kate's ship' which was named by the Duchess of Cambridge last year.

You need to be set up nicely before being cast ashore into bustling St Petersburg for a two-day stop and my friend Satpal and I certainly were.

Formerly Leningrad, St Petersburg was famously the scene of the bitter siege lasting two years and four months during Second World War.

The city's impenetrable air became apparent as imperial buildings loomed imposingly when we took a river cruise along the Neva.

By coach, the traffic was chaos. But once we got about on foot, the city opened up to reveal its rich and turbulent history.

The Church of the Saviour on Spilled Blood is not to be missed. It's built on the spot where Tsar Alexander II was assassinated in 1881 and has colourful Russian Orthodox enamel onion domes on the outside and golden mosaics inside.

The visit to the former Russian capital was the only overnight stop on Royal's Baltic itinerary, and we were also treated to a special visit for cruise guests to St Catherine's Palace.

Although it was a trek through those clogged roads, we were greeted with a Champagne reception and the trumpets of the Royal Guardsman Orchestra.

Inside, we were dazzled by the opulent gilded gala rooms, and enjoyed a special baroque dance performance with a string quartet and more Champagne.

The second day brought a whistlestop tour of the Hermitage, one of the world's biggest art museums where you can see the works of Picasso, Michelangelo, Rembrandt, Van Gogh and a host of others, which takes over the entire Winter Palace.

Onwards to Helsinki, which could not have been more of a contrast.

The cloudy weather lifted and we watched endless archipelagos on our approach into the land which brought us Nokia - and the Moomins.

We were whisked to the Old Market Hall full of trinkets and local produce, where we were treated to Finnish Pulla, a bread infused with cardamom, and later beautiful fish soups made with milk.

Boarding Royal in Copenhagen had been a doddle - the port a 30-minute journey from the airport by taxi and the ship docked close to the Little Mermaid statue.

We were able to get a shuttle bus relatively easily into the centre of Denmark's capital, which was filled with bicycles, calm air and people busy being part of the official Happiest Country in the World. Armed with maps, we explored this beautiful city.

Back on the ship that night, there were plenty of restaurants to choose from - vast buffets to fantastic dining rooms offering four-course meals tempted us.

And if you can't bear to leave your cabin, 24-hour complimentary room service is at hand. Indulgence is the only option, I'm afraid.

Oslo was our second stop after Copenhagen. The city centre was on the doorstep, but we headed to the Hadeland glass factory, 45 minutes away in Jevnaker. Here, we were awestruck by Randsfjorden, Norway's fourth largest lake. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Beauty in the Baltic; ANGELA WORMALD Discovers the Delights of Russia and Scandinavia on Her First Cruise
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.