MODERN SLAVERY WE CAN STOP IT; SPONSORED FEATURE; It's Time to Send Slavery Back into the History Books. Here's How

Daily Mail (London), October 27, 2014 | Go to article overview

MODERN SLAVERY WE CAN STOP IT; SPONSORED FEATURE; It's Time to Send Slavery Back into the History Books. Here's How


Child trafficking, forced labour and domestic servitude sound like horrors from far away or long ago. But modern slavery is a very real curse in the UK today. Each year the authorities discover terrified, broken victims of this appalling crime. People whose lives, health and dignity have been destroyed by criminal gangs who prey on some of the most vulnerable people in our society.

Victims of modern slavery can be UK citizens or people brought to the UK from overseas and it is estimated there are 29.8 million people in slavery round the world*. Victims can be any age and can be manipulated into work or actions they would never otherwise consider - often because they are threatened with * Walk Free Foundation, Global Slavery extreme violence if they refuse, seek help or try to escape. Some victims are forced to work long hours in factories, houses or other businesses. Others are forced into prostitution or crime. But all are stripped of their humanity by being sold - just like objects - to different employers across the country.

Action is being taken to tackle modern slavery in the UK and we can all play our part by being aware and looking out for those needing help.

Go to www.modernslavery.co.uk for more information and pass on the link to as many others as you can.

The more people there are who understand modern slavery, the faster we can stamp it out - for good.

ONE STORY OF MANY

VICTIM OF SEXUAL EXPLOITATION

Modern slavery takes many forms - and includes far too many horrors.

One anonymous victim's nightmare began when she was just 13 years old. She was sexually exploited by someone she thought of as a family member - a much older man who started to drive her around to different houses near her home town in Wales. …

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