Canadian Occupational Performance Measure Performance Scale: Validity and Responsiveness in Chronic Pain

By Nieuwenhuizen, Mieke G.; de Groot, Sonja et al. | Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development, May 2014 | Go to article overview

Canadian Occupational Performance Measure Performance Scale: Validity and Responsiveness in Chronic Pain


Nieuwenhuizen, Mieke G., de Groot, Sonja, Janssen, Thomas W. J., van der, Lia C. C., Beckerman, Heleen, Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development


INTRODUCTION

Chronic pain of moderate to severe intensity occurs in 19 percent of the adult European population [1]. People with chronic pain visiting our rehabilitation center report that pain seriously affects their daily activities and social and working lives and that it also has an effect on their emotional status and ability to remain independent. When there is no effective treatment option to relieve (nonspecific) pain, i.e., by operation, drug therapy, nerve block, massage, or exercise, people are often told to "learn to live with the pain" instead of seeking help to stop the pain. To help these people, multidisciplinary chronic pain rehabilitation programs have been designed, including cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise therapy, and occupational therapy [2-5]. An important goal of these programs is to enable people to reduce disability or to regain independence and improve quality of life in the presence of chronic pain [6-8]. Quality of life and functioning are two important concepts with many definitions. When we refer to quality of life in the present study, health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) is meant, which is the functional effect of a medical condition and/ or its consequent therapy upon a patient [9-10]. HR-QOL is thus subjective and multidimensional, encompassing physical and occupational function, psychological state, social interaction, and somatic sensation [9]. Functioning is the most essential dimension of HR-QOL [11-12]. It refers to physical and mental functioning and role functioning, three of eight health concepts of HR-QOL most affected by disease and treatment [13] that can be measured with the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (RAND36) [14]. Physical functioning is defined as the ability to carry out various activities that require physical capability, ranging from self-care and basic activities of daily living to more vigorous activities that require increasing degrees of mobility, strength, or endurance [15].

Quality of life and functioning correlate to the concept of occupational performance that has been defined in the Canadian Model of Occupational Performance as the ability to choose, organize, and satisfactorily perform meaningful daily activities, which are specific to the person. Occupation refers to groups of activities and tasks of everyday life, named, organized, and given value and meaning by individuals within their cultural context. Occupation is everything people do to occupy themselves, including looking after themselves (self-care), enjoying life (leisure), and contributing to the social and economic fabric of their communities (productivity) [16].

Individuals may differ in how much importance they attribute to specific occupational abilities and activities. When the patients' choice and self-evaluation are incorporated, positive treatment effects on motivation, participation, and functional recovery have been found in different patient populations and clinical settings [17-19]. Preferably, individualized measures sensitive to varying needs and situations should be included in pain rehabilitation. Most outcome measures used in rehabilitation, however, focus on limitations and problems in fixed activities and participation areas [17].

The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) [20] was developed to identify and prioritize patient-specific occupational problems and evaluate changes in these problems. As such, it can be a feasible and helpful clinical tool within the therapeutic process, especially in the treatment of patients with chronic pain, which mainly focuses on improving performance and changes in participation rather than in bodily functions. In a semistructured interview, the patient is encouraged to identify those activities that he or she wants, needs, or is expected to do but cannot do or those in which the patient is not satisfied with the current performance. The COPM is a generic measure, meaning it can be used in all populations regardless of diagnosis, as long as the patients are able to reflect on their lives and activities and are able to communicate on these. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Canadian Occupational Performance Measure Performance Scale: Validity and Responsiveness in Chronic Pain
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.