Peru's Regional Elections Show Splintered Politics

By Jana, Elsa Chanduvi | NotiSur - South American Political and Economic Affairs, October 24, 2014 | Go to article overview

Peru's Regional Elections Show Splintered Politics


Jana, Elsa Chanduvi, NotiSur - South American Political and Economic Affairs


Results of municipal and regional elections Oct. 5 present a depressing panorama of the national political scene: in Lima the winning candidate was the one who "steals but also produces public works;" the leftist mayor ended up in third place; and national political parties all but disappeared with victories going to candidates from regional organizations, many of whom are either under investigation for serious crimes or already face court action on such charges.

Lima's former mayor Luis Castaneda Lossio (2003-2006, 2007-2010) from the Partido Solidaridad Nacional (PSN) won with 50.7% of the votes, reported the Organizacion Nacional de Procesos Electorales (ONPE). The surprise was that Partido Aprista Peruano (APRA) candidate Enrique Cornejo moved up from fourth to second place with 17.7% of the vote, pushing out Susana Villaran, the current mayor who received just 10.6% (NotiSur, Nov. 30, 2012, and March 29, 2013).

In an Ipsos Peru poll taken in the last week of September, 59% of Lima's population said they would prefer that the next mayor be someone who carried out public works projects even if they stole. Only 16% said they would prefer a mayor who didn't steal even if they didn't initiate public works projects. Castaneda's main slogan during his campaign was "So the public works [projects] return."

Right-wing media presented an image of Villaran as someone who had initiated few or no public works in nearly four years in office. Apparently voters bought that idea.

However, with Villaran at the helm of the Metropolitan Municipality of Lima, there was greater implementation of public works spending than during Castaneda's first period, according to official data from the Ministry of Economy and Finance. From 2003 to 2006, 42.5% of the total planned investment budget was implemented, while from 2011 to 2014, an average of 65.2% was spent. Villaran's average was even higher than the 63.0% in Castaneda's second term.

"In absolute terms, Castaneda's first administration spent 553 million soles [US$192.6 million] while Villaran spent 1.4 billion soles [US $488.8 million] (projected through December 2014). The current mayor spent more than two and one-half times more than the former mayor," said the Peruvian daily Diario 16.

Mayor-elect Castaneda told weekly news magazine Correo Semanal Oct. 16, "Ms. Susana Villaran said she had spent twice as much on works as I did, in other words, she must have stolen twice as much. But consider this, the second thing we should think about regarding those who don't produce works is where did the money go?"

Splintered left

Referring to results of elections involving Villaran in Lima as well as those involving Gregorio Santos in Cajamarca and other regional leaders, particularly those in mining areas, political analyst Sinesio Lopez said the right-wing business community and the right-wing media had developed a political strategy to push the left off the national political scene (NotiSur, July 26, 2013, and Sept. 19, 2014).

Internal disagreements within the left played a role in Villaran's electoral defeat. The mayor ran under the umbrella of Dialogo Vecinal, a registered political group. Although Tierra y Libertad of the Frente Amplio (FA) also held a current registration and had been an ally, that group decided not to back her candidacy after she allied herself with Peru Posible (PP), the party of former President Alejandro Toledo (2001-2006), who is under investigation for possible money laundering. Villaran had tried to present a broad centrist coalition with Peru Posible's support.

Anthropologist and historian Carlos Monge of Tierra y Libertad wrote in his blog La Mula, "Villaran refused to run on the Frente Amplio ticket in the primary elections or present herself as a Frente Amplio candidate and instead sought alliances with Peru Possible and, in a last ditch effort, she sought out an alliance with Dialogo Vecinal to back away from a leftist identity and the need to deal with internal democracy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Peru's Regional Elections Show Splintered Politics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.