Food for Thought

The Journal (Newcastle, England), November 6, 2014 | Go to article overview

Food for Thought


Sara Pascoe vs History, The Stand Newcastle First things first, when it comes to shows living up to their title, Sara Pascoe's debut UK touring show does not do what is says on the tin.

The 33-year-old comic, who is deservedly becoming a force to be reckoned with, thanks to a string of profile-raising TV appearances offering an bite-sized outlet for her original brand of storytelling and observations, does not take on history in this show.

What she does do is offer a wonderful and non-stop once around her utterly compelling - and incredibly funny - thoughts on female sexuality, relationships and a myriad of other stuff including manipulative trousers, her love for her boyfriend's baby belly and the etiquette of drying pubic hair in public.

As far as the history bit is concerned, Sara - a daughter of a 70s pop star and a groupie thereof who waited until he was on his uppers to make her move - name checks and uses figures from the past to underpin and flesh out a multitude of musings about love, and more specifically how hopeful she can be about making her current boyfriend her final boyfriend. …

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