Mississippi Praying: Southern White Evangelicals and the Civil Rights Movement, 1945-1975

By Haberman, Aaron L. | The Journal of Southern History, November 2014 | Go to article overview

Mississippi Praying: Southern White Evangelicals and the Civil Rights Movement, 1945-1975


Haberman, Aaron L., The Journal of Southern History


Mississippi Praying: Southern White Evangelicals and the Civil Rights Movement, 1945-1975. By Carolyn Renee Dupont. (New York and London: New York University Press, 2013. Pp. [xiv], 289. $55.00, ISBN 978-0-8147-0841-5.)

Carolyn Renee Dupont's examination of Mississippi white evangelicals' fervent support of segregation during the 1950s and 1960s offers historians a fresh interpretation of the confounding paradox of God-fearing whites condoning and even participating in massive resistance. In the process, Dupont challenges the idea of "cultural captivity"--which many contemporaneous and early historical accounts asserted--whereby white evangelicals were primarily guilty at worst of refusing to speak out against the violent backlash to civil rights because they were subsumed by the larger culture of white supremacy (p. 6). Instead, the author argues that these white evangelicals actively supported the preservation of segregation, having constructed both a theological and a social rationale for their commitment to the racial status quo, which proved instrumental to the Mississippi white power structure's ability to resist desegregation for as long as it did. In this sense, Mississippi Praying: Southern White Evangelicals and the Civil Rights Movement, 1945-1975 takes its cue from Bethany Moreton's To Serve God and Wal-Mart: The Making of Christian Free Enterprise (Cambridge, Mass., 2009) and Darren Dochuk's From Bible Belt to Sunbelt: Plain-Folk Religion, Grassroots Politics, and the Rise of Evangelical Conservatism (New York, 2011), which have shown how evangelicals did not compartmentalize their theological and economic outlooks within their larger political ideologies. Similarly, Dupont finds a symbiosis between evangelicals' theology and racial stances. According to the author, "Having accepted both evangelicalism and white supremacy as unassailable truths for years, these Mississippians generally regarded as patently absurd the notion that God frowned on their racial arrangements; the sudden appearance of segregation in some syllabus of sins jolted their sensibilities' (p. 2).

Relying significantly on the records of evangelical churches and ministers, Mississippi Praying is as much a story about the debates between national organizations and local Mississippi chapters of Southern Baptists, Methodists, and Presbyterians as it is an accounting of white evangelical resistance to desegregation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Mississippi Praying: Southern White Evangelicals and the Civil Rights Movement, 1945-1975
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.