Klansville, U.S.A.: The Rise and Fall of the Civil Rights-Era Ku KIux Klan

By Coffey, Michele Grigsby | The Journal of Southern History, November 2014 | Go to article overview

Klansville, U.S.A.: The Rise and Fall of the Civil Rights-Era Ku KIux Klan


Coffey, Michele Grigsby, The Journal of Southern History


Klansville, U.S.A.: The Rise and Fall of the Civil Rights-Era Ku KIux Klan. By David Cunningham. (New York and other cities: Oxford University Press, 2013. Pp. xiv, 337. $29.95, ISBN 978-0-19-975202-7.)

David Cunningham's Klansville, U.S.A.: The Rise and Fall of the Civil Rights-Era Ku KIux Klan is an intricate examination of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) during the years of the civil rights movement, primarily in North Carolina. Through a masterful weaving of accessible prose, statistical examination, and theoretical analysis, Cunningham complicates the traditional narratives regarding the "third wave" of the racially motivated terrorist organization and in the process provides keen insights into the cultural, social, and above all political aspects of the South. While the historiography of the KKK during this period has primarily focused on states like Mississippi and Alabama, where Klan violence was particularly gruesome and prevalent, Cunningham examines the state with the largest membership and the surface-level paradox of high Klan activity in a state attempting to brand itself as progressive.

Through extensive primary and secondary research, Cunningham reveals a number of interesting structural relationships surrounding the Klan. He effectively argues that the post--World War II KKK was more accurately a near-seamless continuation of its predecessors, as each adaptation of the organization framed itself within the context of the previous versions' ideologies, missions, and structures. Additionally, in his section analyzing those who joined the third KKK, Cunningham reveals the multigenerational appeal of the organization, as men joined the latest version of the group with which their forefathers were affiliated. Further, he demonstrates the correlation between the regressive policies of a state and the relative attraction to the Klan. This analysis explains why membership was so high in a state like North Carolina, where politicians intentionally took more centrist political stances. Cunningham contends that in places like Mississippi, where the state functioned as a regressive, white supremacist organization itself, fewer individuals felt it necessary to do more than vote as a means to advance their anti-civil rights agenda or as a way to protect what they saw as their economic, political, and social interests as white southerners. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Klansville, U.S.A.: The Rise and Fall of the Civil Rights-Era Ku KIux Klan
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.