Collaborative Responsive Education Mentoring: Mentoring for Professional Development in Higher Education

By Bryant-Shanklin, Mona; Brumage, Norma W. | Florida Journal of Educational Administration and Policy, Fall 2011 | Go to article overview

Collaborative Responsive Education Mentoring: Mentoring for Professional Development in Higher Education


Bryant-Shanklin, Mona, Brumage, Norma W., Florida Journal of Educational Administration and Policy


The supposition of this paper is the development of a mentor/mentee relationship where mentoring occurs between a senior person (faculty) and junior person (teacher candidate/practicing teacher). This relationship is elucidated using the Collaborative Responsive Education Mentoring Model (CREMM). This mentoring model is particularly relevant as some Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and less research-intensive universities shift their mission and purpose of teaching to a scholar-teacher model for research development. Even though mentoring was not recognized for its benefits by many researchers and human relation specialists until the 1980's, mentoring was held in high esteem and viewed as the method of choice in schools of education. This perspective was particularly true in schools of education at HBCUs where producing teachers was a major objective of these schools (Thomas, 2007). Both faculty and the teacher candidates/practicing teachers can benefit from this process as they endeavor to complete research, teaching, and service activities at some of the HBCUs and other less intensive research universities.

This relationship is elucidated using the Collaborative Responsive Education Mentoring Model (CREMM) for two reasons:

1) the emphasis of CREMM is on the collaborative process of mentoring between faculty members and pre-service teacher candidates or practicing teachers, and

2) the increased number of pre-service teacher candidates/practicing teachers who are nontraditional students enrolled in school of education programs at serviced-focused and less research intensive universities, particularly in graduate programs. The non-traditional, professional students bring with them classroom and world experiences. This paradigm impacts the relationships that are formed between faculty members and pre-service teacher candidates or practicing teachers that exceed the traditional teacher-student relationship.

In the scholar/teacher relationship, the major focus of the interaction is research development and educational enhancement for all participants. It is posited in this paper that both faculty members and pre-service teacher candidates or practicing teachers can benefit from this process as they endeavor to complete research, teaching, and service activities at service-focused and less research intensive universities. This model also supports the formalization of mentoring relationships beyond the individual universities as mentoring partnerships can be established among diverse groups of faculty at multiple colleges and universities to conduct collaborative research projects.

Definitions of Terms

For the purpose of this paper, the following terms will be used to explicate the understanding of the central concepts presented:

* Mentoring is a process involving two or more individuals working together to develop the careers and abilities of all participants.

* "The Culture of Teaching" involves educating pre-service students and post-graduate professionals in their understanding of the issues that impact the learning progression of diverse students in education. Similarly, relative to mentoring, these pre-service students and professionals can develop a comprehensive construct of diversity and intercultural relationships.

* "Cultural Responsiveness" acknowledges the legitimacies of cultural heritages both as legacies that affect students' dispositions, attitudes, and approaches to learning and the formal curriculum (Gay, 2000).

* A scholar-teacher model of education provides university faculty and pre-service students/professional educators' opportunities to produce and increase relevant research in the academy.

This paper will provide a review of the literature that introduces and supports a collaborative and structured scholar/teacher mentoring program.

Literature Review

Concepts and Processes of Mentoring

Mentoring relationships have existed for centuries and were first identified in Greek mythology. …

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