Ready for STEM? A Leading Commercial Multimedia Database as a Source for Media-Rich Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Assets for K-12 Library Collections

By Mardis, Marcia A. | Library Resources & Technical Services, October 2014 | Go to article overview

Ready for STEM? A Leading Commercial Multimedia Database as a Source for Media-Rich Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Assets for K-12 Library Collections


Mardis, Marcia A., Library Resources & Technical Services


National emphases on STEM learning and digital textbooks have highlighted the importance of high quality digital instructional materials. Because teachers often lack the time and expertise to find, assess, and organize multimedia, school librarians can support STEM learning by providing media-rich, current, curriculum-linked library collections. To determine whether Discovery Education Streaming, a leading commercial database is a viable source of school library STEM resources, the researcher analyzed its multimedia assets by media, grade, category, and copyright. Results suggested that the database's extensive content was comprised mainly of video segments, complete videos, and images but that this content was outdated, had uneven grade coverage, and addressed limited topics. While the results raise concerns about Discovery Education Streaming as an enhancement to library collections, careful use of these sources may allow school librarians opportunities to integrate high quality digital assets into their collections through specific strategies for policy, research, and practice.

**********

Effective science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning experiences center on two variables: high quality learning resources and high quality pedagogy; deeply intertwined, neither variable alone is sufficient to improve student achievement. (1) The role of resources in K-12 education is so crucial that the ability to locate instructional information is a significant driver of teacher quality, and confidence in the ability to integrate available resources can be used as a proxy measure of educator effectiveness. (2) For these reasons, the school library collection matters. The school librarian is the sole educator tasked with building and maintaining a collection of diverse, high quality, current resources that support curriculum, complement adopted texts, enable professional learning, and pique student interest. Despite the pleas of school library researchers, policymakers, and educators for making instructional collaboration and leadership the defining elements of the school librarian's role, three decades of scholarly researchers have consistently concluded that a well-curated collection of learning resources assembled and maintained by a qualified school library professional has a measurable relationship with student achievement. (3)

Current educational initiatives may give the school library collection an even greater role in student learning. The US Department of Education is urging school administrators to focus on two main reform issues: STEM education and digital textbooks. (4) Policymakers have noted that "the world today's students will inherit will be one defined to an even greater degree by science and technology," "mastery of mathematics, science, and technology is no longer only for future scientists and engineers; it is essential preparation for all students," and that technology tools and digital content are essential components of fostering STEM learning. (5)

Promoting district and state level adoption of digital textbooks, or collections of high quality, interactive digital multimedia learning content, has been at the forefront of federal education initiatives. (6)

Florida has enacted the Digital Learning Now Act (Senate Bill 2120/House Bill 7917) that mandates that public schools will use at least 50 percent digital instructional materials by the 2015-16 school year. (7) This move was significant not only because Florida is a textbook adoption benchmark state, but also since the law is the first of its kind. Two other states have similar laws. California's legislation encourages, but does not mandate, digital textbooks in public schools by 2020. In 2010, Illinois passed legislation redefining textbooks to include digital formats. The Florida law is the most ambitious measure, requiring full implementation of digital textbooks by 2015, and it is anticipated that other states are soon to follow. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Ready for STEM? A Leading Commercial Multimedia Database as a Source for Media-Rich Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Assets for K-12 Library Collections
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.