Current Bibliography

By Brooks, Tim | ARSC Journal, Fall 2014 | Go to article overview

Current Bibliography


Brooks, Tim, ARSC Journal


"Current Bibliography" is an annotated index to research on recording history that has appeared recently in specialized journals. lb be indexed here an article must be in English, be reasonably substantive, and deal with recording history--as opposed to musicology, sociology, or contemporary subjects such as collecting or record reviews. "W/D" or "discog." means that the article was accompanied by something at least remotely resembling a discography. Issues covered this time were received between March and August, 2014. If you contact one of these publications or authors, please mention ARSC and "Current Bibliography. " Corrections or suggested entries may be sent to the compiler at tim@timbrooks.net.

News of Publications

There have been quite a few interesting articles in recording-related publications lately. In the June 2014 Bluegrass Unlimited, Rhonda Vincent, one of the leading bluegrass band leaders ("Rhonda Vincent and The Rage"), reflects on being a woman in that traditionally male-dominated field. Speaking of her time with a Nashville label, she says, "They wanted to put me in these silver space pants; they asked me to sing a song that said, Come over here, honey, and sit on my lap and open a beer.' And I just called them and said 'I would never sing that'."

Long-haired rocker Sebastian Bach talks about losing much of his memorabilia when his New Jersey house was flooded and destroyed by Hurricane Irene in 2011 (Goldmine, August 2014). What survived were primarily items in the upper floors. Do you keep your best stuff in the attic?

The August Goldmine also has an interesting article called "Inventorying Your Collection Is the First Line of Defense When Disaster Strikes," by professional appraiser Wayne Jordan. To protect your investment and make sure insurers pay up, he says, you should inventory every needle tin and teacup, take pictures of each item "from several angles" (for LPs, "be sure to photograph the front and back cover, the records and the labels, as well as any inserts"), number everything, and enter them all into a database. Is this guy nuts? He has obviously not encountered the giant collections held by some ARSC members.

Leslie Gerber has compiled a surprisingly long list of classical musicians who recorded from the acoustic to the stereo eras--52 in all--in "Acoustic to Stereo" (Classical Recordings Quarterly, Summer 2014). They range from Marian Anderson to Bruno Walter, and include three who have continued into the digital age. How many can you name?

The City of London Phonograph and Gramophone Society reports with sadness the death of longtime member, and Society Patron, Mike Field, in February 2014 at the age of 87. In For the Record, President Christopher Proudfoot said, "Who will cut gears for us now?"

Cassette Store Day?

Record Store Day, founded in 2007 and celebrated annually on the third Saturday in April, has been a major success in drawing attention to independently owned record stores and the vinyl record format. Now a group of British independent labels has launched Cassette Store Day, kicking off in 2013 and observed each September. U.S. coordinator the Burger Records label said, "Burger Records loves tapes! We've built our foundation on the forgotten format and have been preaching the merits of warm analog cassette culture for years." Artist Bobby Gillespie (of Primal Scream) added, "Cassette is a cool medium to listen to music on. Warm and fat. Good bottom end. Yeah!"

I hereby propose the establishment of Cylinder Store Day. Nothing was as warm and fat as those round, firm, fully packed Edison Blue Amberols. However first we have to find a cylinder store.

Honoring--And Obsessing on--Celebrities

As some of you may have seen in the Summer 2014 ARSC Newsletter, 1890s African-American recording pioneer George W. Johnson has finally been honored with a plaque at his gravesite at Maple Grove Cemetery, Queens, New York. …

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