Union of Southern Africa Solves Colonialism

Cape Times (South Africa), November 20, 2014 | Go to article overview

Union of Southern Africa Solves Colonialism


THE PEOPLE of Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania and Namibia should form a "Union of Southern Africa". The present territorial boundaries are artificial, having been arbitrarily drawn by European colonialists guided only by European interests and motives.

The formation of this union should be in stages; the first stage is the formation of an Economic Union, embodied in a Central Economic Council for Southern Africa.

This economic union should go much further than the mere formation of a "single trade area"; indeed, much further than Nepad: this Central Economic Council for Southern Africa should be the decisive arm and brain in formulating planning and investment policies for the entire union.

The formation of this union shall be in stages also in the sense that not all the currently existing states may agree to merge at the same time, even at the economic level: the union may begin, perhaps, with the agreement of two, or perhaps four, nation-states; others may follow later, as happened with the EU.

The failure of development and psychological-mental illnesses are on such a large scale now that African societies are facing a catastrophe similar to a war situation. A serious war threat, or a war situation, such as that faced by Britain in 1940, requires centralised decision-making, centralised planning, and mobilisation of resources.

Leon Trotsky warned, in his criticism of Stalinist planning, that centralised management of the economy implies not only great advantages but also the "danger of centralising the mistakes".

Rational planning requires the inclusion of democratic discussion, democratic control and a critical spirit, within the centralisation and planning process.

Capitalism gave rise to economic and cultural processes that tend to cross all territorial boundaries in the world; capitalism also generated the modern desires for equality and freedom. The positive features of capitalism became intertwined with its negative features. Both the positive features and negative features of capitalism call for co-operation and planning among nation-states. The dangers of war and destruction, alone, call for co-operation and planning among nations.

Integration of nation-states at the regional level, and across the territorial boundaries of the globe, is a universal inner urge and tendency of our time.

This universal urge and tendency must be knit together and guided by justice and equality for all communities. The integration of economic and science activities is occurring informally across nation-states; what needs to occur now is the formalisation of this integration at the political level. These tendencies, and this urge, are also manifesting themselves in southern Africa. …

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