Military Review

By Friederich-Maggard, Anna R. | Military Review, November-December 2014 | Go to article overview

Military Review


Friederich-Maggard, Anna R., Military Review


Greetings! The year 2014 was exceptional for Military Review. We realized many of our goals as an organization and as a publication, finally attaining full staffing and incorporating most of the promised changes to the journal. Our most important improvement was adding color to the journal's English edition to enhance its appearance and readability.

More changes are in Military Review's future. Possibly as early as February we will join forces with the Combat Studies Institute (CSI) to form a new organization called the Army Press. As a combined team we will serve as the focal point for identifying, encouraging, and supporting authors who desire to publish original manuscripts on the Army's history, policy, doctrine, training, organization, leader development, professionalism, or any other topic of interest to the Army. These contributions can be in the form of books, monographs, or articles. We will provide help to potential authors through mentoring and coaching, ensuring the Press' programs and products enable scholarship, facilitate professional dialogue, and promote an enhanced understanding of the Army and the Profession of Arms.

Because Military Review can only accept a fraction of the submissions we receive, we will work to place those articles we do not publish in other Army, Department of Defense, or Center of Excellence publications. We will also provide recommendations for manuscript revisions (if needed) before forwarding them to other periodicals to increase their potential for publication. More information on the transition of Military Review and CSI to the Army Press is forthcoming.

This edition of Military Review contains some very unique articles that will grab your attention and perhaps stir some debate. As you can see by our stunning cover photo, we want to draw your attention to an article about the importance of Arctic training and the Army's challenges in dealing with Arctic warfare contingencies that might arise. …

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