The Difficult Legacy of Blaise Compaore

By Plaut, Martin | New Statesman (1996), November 7, 2014 | Go to article overview

The Difficult Legacy of Blaise Compaore


Plaut, Martin, New Statesman (1996)


On 31 October, Blaise Compaore, the strongman who held Burkina Faso together for 27 years, went into exile following street protests against his attempt to extend his rule once again. The impoverished West African country now has a military government, led by the interim president, Lieutenant Colonel Isaac Zida, who has promised a rapid handover to civilian rule but has given no date for this transition.

Compaore's departure will be greeted with mixed emotions by western policymakers. Although his reputation was grim, there is deep concern that one of the west's few secure allies in an unstable region has been overthrown.

Diplomats had few illusions about the man sometimes dubbed "handsome Blaise". Compaore was a repressive ruler who ruthlessly eliminated his opposition. Two ministers were executed in 1989 after denouncing the government's "right-wing drift" and the country became a virtual one-party state. In 2011, he brutally crushed protests by students and the military.

Compaore was also a notorious womaniser. Female foreign correspondents carefully avoided late-night "Burkinabe discussions" with the president. A leaked US diplomatic cable from 2008 quoted the views of a French diplomat about their mutual ally. Compaore was reported to have a "reputation as a sexual 'gourmand' whose appetite was so strong that he had previously had 'Rasputin-like' escapades with the wife of at least one of his cabinet ministers".

Compaore overthrew the previous regime in 1983 with the help of Thomas Sankara. The presidency went to Sankara, who eschewed ceremony and good living. He developed a cult following and became known as the Che Guevara of Africa. Within four years, relations between the two men had soured. Sankara was assassinated and Compaore assumed power. Compaore always denied having a hand in Sankara's death, describing it as "an accident", but many in Burkina Faso did not believe him.

Having secured the presidency, he began consolidating his position. He made friends with key regional leaders. He had been close to the Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi for years. He also maintained good relations with the notorious Liberian warlord Charles Taylor. A web of influence soon extended from Burkina Faso across West Africa and northwards, across the Sahara. …

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