Letting Learning Technology Flourish: Schools-And Teaching-Must Change to Compete in a Knowledge Economy

By Goral, Tim | District Administration, December 2014 | Go to article overview

Letting Learning Technology Flourish: Schools-And Teaching-Must Change to Compete in a Knowledge Economy


Goral, Tim, District Administration


A photo on Scott McLeod's popular "Dangerously Irrelevant" blog carries the caption, " We're so busy doing 20th century teaching, we don't have time to initiate 21st century learning. " That, in a nutshell, is McLeod's driving concern about K12 education. A country that doesn't embrace technology and innovation in its education system cannot hope to compete in an increasingly knowledge-based economy. "Job growth in America, in terms of numbers, is around non-routine cognitive work--the stuff that requires sophisticated mental thinking, creative work, problem-solving, collaboration--and we aren't doing a good job preparing students for that, " he says.

An associate professor of educational leadership at the University of Kentucky, McLeod is also founding director of the University Council for Education Administrations Center for the Advanced Study of Technology Leadership in Education (CASTLE), "the nation's only academic center dedicated to the technology needs of school administrators."

You've written that administrative restraints have rendered much of school technology useless.

Yes, that's based on something writer Tim Cushing said. Everyone is trying to get more technology into their schools for kids to use, but then we add so many restrictions, barriers, blocks and filters. It's like we're trying hard to get the tech in there but also trying as hard as we can to keep kids from using it. It's great that we have these devices, but we've got to embed them within environments of empowerment, not restriction.

Keith Krueger from CoSN noted that the problem is leading with technology rather than pedagogy. Would you agree?

Yes, absolutely. Most of the time the focus is on getting the tools and the infrastructure and not on what kind of learning experiences we are trying to enable. So we see a lot of replicative technology use where we are doing the same things we did before. Still lots of note-taking. Still lots of low-level PowerPoint presentations. They look up stuff on the web. And that's pretty much all they've got in a lot of these districts. They are proud because they are 1-to-l, but they are not really using it to best effect.

Is it that teachers are unfamiliar with the technology?

The problem lies in the predominant views around learning and teaching that are still recall and regurgitation. Until we're ready to rethink learning and teaching, how we use these devices isn't going to change. If you are vetted in a regurgitative model of schooling, then this idea of student empowerment, and project-based learning, and inquiry, doesn't fit into that model very well. So you are going to use devices in low-level ways because that's what your model of teaching and learning looks like.

Schools are primarily about repetitive, low-level routine cognitive work. That's exactly the wrong emphasis in our society today, from an economic standpoint.

The factory model of schooling isn't compatible with a knowledge economy?

Right. The factory model prepares compliant workers to do repetitive, routine work. We have a convergence of globalization fostered by rapid growth and technology in the internet, and this has moved all that work elsewhere.

Our schools haven't yet adapted to the new economic realities of a technology-suffused knowledge economy.

You speak to educators all the time. They must see the problem too, right?

A lot of it has to do with time. It's not that these awesome teachers are unwilling. It's that they recognize that they don't have the skills or knowledge and they don't have the time or the leadership supports or system supports to make it happen. They often feel like they are left adrift on their own to figure it out. That can be very overwhelming.

And that can lead to stifling the tools that should be helping students learn?

Right. That's more of a leadership thing. How do we think about devices? …

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