A New "Class" of Undergraduate Professors: Examining Teaching Beliefs and Practices of Science Faculty with Education Specialties

By Addy, Tracie M.; Simmons, Patricia et al. | Journal of College Science Teaching, January-February 2015 | Go to article overview

A New "Class" of Undergraduate Professors: Examining Teaching Beliefs and Practices of Science Faculty with Education Specialties


Addy, Tracie M., Simmons, Patricia, Gardner, Grant E., Albert, Jennifer, Journal of College Science Teaching


There is an African proverb that states "When cobwebs unite, they can tie up a lion," emphasizing the importance of collaboration among individuals to accomplish a seemingly impossible task. Scientific disciplines, professional societies, and other organizations focusing on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning in higher education have been attempting to "capture the lion." They are tackling the seemingly daunting task of reforming STEM learning in higher education and agreeing on particular teaching and learning ideologies. There are several anticipated challenges that drive the improvement of undergraduate teaching and learning, such as retaining more students to supply a national need for science employees, equipping students with the skills that they will need in the workforce, enhancing the participation of underrepresented groups, and adapting to changing student demographics and technological advancements within higher education (National Academy of Sciences, 2011; President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, 2012). Despite the challenge, there is general agreement that effective STEM instruction should (a) be student centered such that it acknowledges the learner's backgrounds, dispositions, and prior knowledge and (b) place less emphasis on didactic instruction and more emphasis on student construction of knowledge (Wright, 2011).

Nationwide change has been slow to occur possibly because increased emphasis on education efforts have occurred at varying rates within different scientific disciplines (National Research Council, 2012). Historically, the physical sciences emerged as the innovator in postsecondary STEM education. The American Physical Society (APS) took a step by declaring their support for physics education research through the Research in Physics Education Statement (APS, 1999). Likewise, research on improving teaching and learning within chemistry is supported through discipline-specific societies such as the American Chemical Society (2014). Comparable unified promotion of student-centered teaching and learning within biology is a more recent occurrence. With the report Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: A Call to Action, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2011) described the most important concepts and skills to be learned within undergraduate biology as well as supported teaching ideologies. Through the Partnership for Undergraduate Life Sciences Education (http://www.pulsecommunity.org/) movement, major funding agencies, as well as a variety of faculty at universities across the nation, continue to push for changes within postsecondary life sciences education.

Science faculty with education specialties

Key stakeholders that are implementing or assisting with changes within physical and life sciences departments nationally are science faculty with education specialties (SFES). Bush et al. (2006, 2008, 2011, 2013) described SFES as a diverse group of faculty who may be involved in improving departmental curriculum, as well as teaching methods courses for preservice science teachers and/or introductory and upper level science courses for science majors and nonmajors. In addition to their educational focus, SFES may lead a research group within a scientific discipline, discipline-based science education, and/or another science education field. They may have transitioned into their educational roles, as some participants described within the present study. SFES educational backgrounds are varied, with some having a doctoral degree (PhD) within a scientific discipline or discipline-based science education research. Some obtained their doctorate within science education from a department, school, or college of education.

As illustrated in variations described above, SFES cannot be placed in a "one-size-fits-all" categorization scheme (Bush et al., 2013). They are also hired at many different types of institutions, from community colleges to PhD-granting institutions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A New "Class" of Undergraduate Professors: Examining Teaching Beliefs and Practices of Science Faculty with Education Specialties
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.