100 Radical Heroes Who Changed Our World; FROM OLIVER CROMWELL TO ENGLAND PIONEER VIV

The Mirror (London, England), January 7, 2015 | Go to article overview

100 Radical Heroes Who Changed Our World; FROM OLIVER CROMWELL TO ENGLAND PIONEER VIV


Byline: KEVIN MAGUIRE Mirror Associate Editor

Can bitter enemies Arthur Scargill and Margaret Thatcher both be radical heroes? The People's History Museum in Manchester includes the miners' leader and the pit axewoman on a list of 100 men and women who changed Britain by challenging the existing order.

John Monks, chair of the museum and a former TUC leader, admits Thatcher's inclusion is controversial after she destroyed workingclass communities.

"As the first woman Prime Minister and a radical, it was hard to leave her out," argues the Labour peer, whose own hero is Ellen Wilkinson, a leader of the 1936 Jarrow March.

The Manchester museum is seeking PS3,000 sponsors for each of the 100 Radical Heroes to raise PS300,000 after the Tory-led Government cuts its grant. An insurance company has already bought Thatcher.

The 100 radical heroes include brave champions of working people now largely ignored as well as well-known names.

1) Leo Abse 1917-2008: Labour MP, lawyer and gay rights activist.

2) Viv Anderson 1956-: First black footballer to play for England at senior level.

3) Robert Applegarth 1834-1924: Union leader who fought for better education.

4) Nancy Astor 1879-1964: Tory MP and in 1919 the first woman to sit in Parliament.

5) Clement Attlee 1883-1967: PM in the great 1945-51 Labour governments.

6) Thomas Attwood 1783-1856: Political reformer and Birmingham industrialist.

7) Stanley Baldwin 1867-1947: Threetime Tory Prime Minister who eventually gave women the vote on same terms as men.

8) Humphrey Berkeley 1926-1994: Tory MP and homosexual law campaigner.

9) Annie Besant 1847-1933: Birth control champion involved in the 1888 London Match Girls' Strike.

10) Nye Bevan 1897-1960: Brilliant orator, Labour minister and father of the NHS.

11) William Beveridge 1879-1963: Author of 1942 report creating a welfare state.

12) Ernie Bevin 1881-1951: Inspirational union leader and Labour Foreign Secretary.

13) Tony Blair 1953-: Three-time Labour election winner who created minimum wage.

14) Robert Blatchford 1851-1943: Socialist founder of The Clarion newspaper.

15) Margaret Bondfield 1873-1953: Labour MP and first female Cabinet minister

16) Billy Bragg 1957-: Left-wing musician and creator of Red Wedge.

17) John Bright 1811-1889: Anti-Crimean War Liberal, leader of Anti-Corn Law League.

18) Francis Burdett 1770-1844: Aristocrat who fought for working-class votes.

19) John Burns 1858-1943: Quit Liberal government in 1914 over First World War.

20) Jim Callaghan 1912-2005: Wartime sailor who became a Labour Prime Minister.

21) Barbara Castle 1910-2002: Labour minister behind the Equal Pay Act.

22) Winston Churchill 1874-1965: Wartime Prime Minister.

23) William Cobbett 1763-1835: Radical journalist and author of Rural Rides on countryside poverty.

24) Richard Cobden 1804-1865: Free trade campaigner, helped abolish Corn Laws.

25) Jim Connell 1852-1929: Wrote Red Flag socialist anthem, Irish socialist activist.

26) Frank Cousins 1904-1986: Union leader, briefly a Labour Cabinet minister.

27) Walter Crane 1845-1915: Socialist artist and illustrator of children's books.

28) Oliver Cromwell 1599-1658: Overthrew King Charles I and established a brief Republic.

29) William Cuffay 1788-1870: Son of a freed slave and a militant Chartist.

30) Jayaben Desai 1933-2010: A leader of 1976-78 Grunwick Strike for better pay and conditions at a London film-processing firm.

31) Charlotte Despard 1844-1939: Suffragette who fought for animal as well as women's rights.

32) Benjamin Disraeli 1804-1881: One Nation Tory Premier who gave some working men the vote.

33) John Doherty 1798-1854: Cotton spinner union leader popularised in Channel 4's The Mill. …

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