Delia Tijerina Revilla: Artist Statement

By Revilla, Anita Tijerina | Frontiers - A Journal of Women's Studies, September 2014 | Go to article overview

Delia Tijerina Revilla: Artist Statement


Revilla, Anita Tijerina, Frontiers - A Journal of Women's Studies


Delia Tijerina Revilla is a mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She grew up a working-class Tejana on the south side of San Antonio, Texas, and throughout her life faced incredible struggles due to poverty, sexism, racism, and abuse. In spite of all her challenges she single-handedly raised her three children and did everything possible to ensure that they could pursue their goals.

She started doing art in the fifth grade and throughout her life has sketched and enjoyed her work. When she was a child, her family did not give her much attention around her art, so she never felt motivated to pursue it. Later she and her late husband encouraged each other to draw, and they shared their art with each other. Once he passed away, when he was thirty-one and she was thirty years old, she stopped drawing for many years, as she focused all of her energies on raising her children. She became a security guard in the 1980s and worked late hours at a hospital; here she began to sketch again, on breaks and during down times. Still, she never considered herself an artist until she visited her daughter Anita in Las Vegas, who encouraged her to take an oil painting class with her at a local art store. The class was taught by a woman named Gabbie Hirsch, trained at Cornell University, a strong and nurturing teacher who dedicates her time to teaching students in the community--overwhelmingly retired women who have returned to their love of art in their senior years. …

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