Achieve Timeless Style with Pieces of Leather

Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England), January 15, 2015 | Go to article overview

Achieve Timeless Style with Pieces of Leather


Byline: INTERIORS With creative stylist Claire Hornby In association with

LEATHER has long been a favourite when it comes to the chairs and sofas in our homes and this season, the trend is for gorgeous tans and soft, luxurious leathers that are perfect for snuggling up on in these cold, wintery months.

An incredibly versatile fabric, leather works in any room of the house, but for best results stick to one or two statement pieces in each area to really make an impression.

For the bedroom, there's something deliciously decadent about a leather bedframe, but it can also be a stylish alternative to the more traditional wood or metal frame. I love the fabulous Dakota bedframe from Barker and Stonehouse, it's the ultimate in contemporary cool. With clean lines and a soft, light tan leather finish, the Dakota is also a savvy storage option, with lift-up slats revealing storage within the bed.

In the living room, leather is a classic material for an armchair or sofa which will never go out of style, and this season clean lines and a contemporary style in buttery leather is perfect for getting cosy.

Make a feature corner in your living room with a fabulous statement armchair such as the Timothy Oulton Saddle Chair, which is inspired by a traditional horse's saddle. Complete with stirrups on each side and made from hand finished and hand stitched leather, it's a real statement piece that will never go out of fashion.

The perfect place to read quietly, a feature corner is a great way to use space in a large living room. Add an eye-catching rug and bold coffee table to complete the space. The Junk Art Propellor Coffee Table is made from recycled propellers from old Chinese junk boats.

Also made by Timothy Oulton, it's the perfect companion to the Saddle Chair.

Barker and Stonehouse also has the fabulous Houston range which is full of character. …

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