Seven Years of Development: United Nations-Supported Principles for Responsible Management Education

By Haertle, Jonas; Miura, Satoshi | SAM Advanced Management Journal, Autumn 2014 | Go to article overview

Seven Years of Development: United Nations-Supported Principles for Responsible Management Education


Haertle, Jonas, Miura, Satoshi, SAM Advanced Management Journal


This article reflects upon the seven-year development of the United Nations-supported Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) since its inauguration in June 2007. PRME is at once a set of principles (see Table 1) and an initiative. The PRME initiative is a partnership between higher education institutions (HEIs), especially management and business schools that endorse the PRME Principles and the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC)--an UN-business partnership spearheaded by former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan in 2000. Subsequently led by the current UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon, the UNGC encourages corporate citizenship centered around 10 universal principles on human rights, labor, environment, and anticorruption. PRME, along with its "sister" initiative Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI), was launched to engage UNGC's key stakeholders with strong leverage over businesses.

While PRI's main constituent is institutional investors committed to incorporating environmental, social, and corporate governance (ESG) issues into their analysis and decision-making, PRME is set up to garner support of HEIs for advancing corporate citizenship through their main activities: (management and leadership) education, research, and thought leadership. In other words, PRME seeks to encourage HEIs to be key change agents for "an inclusive and sustainable global economy" (PRME's Principle 1) by infusing their activities with values of global social responsibility and sustainability. As of June 2014, the initiative counts more than 550 HEIs from over 80 countries around the world as signatories, and more than one-third of the Financial Times' top-100-ranked business schools are among them. PRME and PRI are gradually and progressively "becoming key leverage points"--to use an expression by Georg Kell, Executive Director of the UNGC (Kell, 2014)--for the UNGC in particular, and the global corporate responsibility and sustainability movement in general (see Table 2 for a comparison of the UNGC, PRME, and PRI).

The article frames PRME's development by focusing on four guiding questions: How has PRME developed? What has enabled this development? What is PRME? What does PRME do?

As for the first two questions, PRME has gradually developed from an initial group of 100 signatories with a Steering Committee and a Secretariat, to a network of more than 550 signatories with a variety of work streams and collaborative projects around the world. Such growth, we contend, was made possible by three factors: 1) continued relevance of the PRME Principles; 2) sustained institutional support from influential stakeholders; and 3) a move toward a multicentric governance structure. The latter two questions are inextricably linked because what PRME is, is constituted by what it does, and vice versa. PRME is not only a global inter-organizational network based on collaborative governance but also has gradually come to form a collaborative community. PRME encourages collaborative learning and collaborative innovation on practice in responsible management education, research, and thought leadership (RME practice in short). This article is thus structured as follows: we will first outline the development of PRME over the past seven years by describing how its main components have emerged, and then analyze its enabling factors. Based on these observations, the article concludes with a model for understanding the nature of PRME.

The Development of PRME: An Overview

PRME as well as the initiative's governance structure have progressively emerged over the years. As Figure 1 shows, there have been two waves in its development: PRME's early years and the past two years since the third PRME Global Forum held in 2012 as a side event of the Rio+20 Global Earth Summit.

Soon after PRME was launched in July 2007, PRME's Steering Committee and the PRME Secretariat were put in place, respectively as PRME's governance body and PRME's network administrator. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Seven Years of Development: United Nations-Supported Principles for Responsible Management Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.