How the Dread of 'Muppet Face' Scared Britain off Plastic Surgery

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), January 25, 2015 | Go to article overview

How the Dread of 'Muppet Face' Scared Britain off Plastic Surgery


Byline: COMMENT By Barney Calman HEALTH EDITOR

DEMAND for cosmetic surgery 'fell of the cliff' last year after nearly a decade of surging popularity, according to the industry's leading professional body.

The British Association of Aesthetic and Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS) publishes its annual audit tomorrow, giving the only accurate insight into how many people in the UK have 'nip and tuck' procedures.

I was given an exclusive look ahead of the report's release.

It reveals that the market shrank by nine per cent overall. Most marked was a plunge in numbers of men opting for a nip and tuck, with a little more than 4,000 going under the knife - a 15 per cent decrease on the previous year.

Nose jobs, which were last year's most popular procedure for men, plummeted by a third, with 713 being carried out, and even the number of 'moob' reductions has dropped by ten per cent.

Eye-lift surgery - blepharoplasty - is now the most popular procedure for men, with 849 patients having theirs 'fixed'.

However, there was still a four per cent fall in blepharoplasty cases overall.

For women, breast augmentation remained the most popular procedure, but numbers deflated by almost a quarter.

LIP SERVICE: is open about her 'The second most popular procedure in women was blepharoplasty, with 7,750 choosing the operation.

So what does it all mean? Well, it could indicate a more cautious approach from the public after a record 50,000 plastic surgery procedures were carried out in Britain the previous year.

Although there's been a downturn in business, BAAPS - which represents the vast majority of NHS-trained consultant plastic surgeons in private practice - certainly welcomes the trend.

Its former president, Rajiv Grover, told me: 'It's not just a slight dip - numbers have dropped off a cliff.

'But if the public are being more thoughtful, cautious and educated in their approach to cosmetic surgery, we are thrilled.' I'd like to think so. Two years ago, The Mail on Sunday launched its Stop The Cosmetic Surgery Cowboys campaign, which urged the Government to regulate the sector and called for commonsense rules, such as allowing only surgeons trained in boob jobs or nose jobs to offer such operations. …

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