Engineering a Future

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), January 28, 2015 | Go to article overview

Engineering a Future


Byline: JANUARY 28, 2015 COLUMNIST EveningChron A multi-tasking mum's view on life JENNY HICKEN

THE region has secured another UK first in preparing young people for the world of work with the launch of Career College North East (CCNE).

The initiative - a partnership between South Tyneside College and the outstanding-rated St Wilfrid's RC school - will be first in the country to focus on advanced manufacturing, engineering and computer science.

The concept stems from the Government's new national education policy of allowing Further Education colleges to recruit students from the age of 14, thereby increasing choice, opportunities and prospects.

Those coming on board in September will follow St Wilfrid's core academic curriculum for four days a week, using the fifth day to undergo skills education at South Tyneside College. As well as providing a clear route into higher education, apprenticeships and careers, it is hoped the college - one of four in the UK - will help tackle the region's skills shortage at a time when the job market is set for a boost through the likes of the proposed International Advanced Manufacturing Park, near Nissan in Sunderland. The new partnership was celebrated at a launch event yesterday, hosted by Geoff Ford, chairman of Ford Aerospace Ltd.

Among the speakers was Lord Kenneth Baker, a former Conservative Minister and chairman of Edge Foundation, an educational charity supporting the Career Colleges route.

"Career College North East will provide this region with the skilled future workforce it so badly needs," he said. "Young people here will have access to employer-led, highquality vocational training, alongside rigorous teaching in the core academic subjects. …

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