Un-Dreaming, Un-Thinking, Un-Eating-Painting

By Pirvu, Bogdan C. S. | Romanian Journal of Artistic Creativity, Winter 2014 | Go to article overview

Un-Dreaming, Un-Thinking, Un-Eating-Painting


Pirvu, Bogdan C. S., Romanian Journal of Artistic Creativity


Un-dreaming ("No matter how hard I try/ I find it impossible to dream.//I cannot manage to sing,/ I cannot manage to eat,/ I cannot manage to dance,/ I cannot// and no matter how hard I try/ I find it impossible to dream") and un-thinking ("I stir up the little cakes/ full of mini olives/ and I chase thoughts away") could be a fairly faithful description of Elleny Pendefunda's creative process. The 13 year-old (with personal exhibitions all through Romania, also in Washington DC; with four poetry volumes to her credit) is a pretty normal teenager going to school early in the morning, having a homemade sandwich at eleven, getting back home at 1 p.m., having an ordinary lunch and then doing her homeworks, mathematics included.

But the picture was less than idyllic a few years back. She was hardly two years old when she contracted a stomach virus, and for nine years, day in day out, she had to live only on rice, boiled meat, carrots, lactosis-free milk-no fruit, no sweets. Today she can eat apples, mellons, but no grapes ... no cabbage, no beans.

A few months ago I put the finishing touches to a research project on the writers' mood, cognitive, and behavioral changes during intense creative episodes-to be seen in Figure 1. Referring to the same changes, Elleny's father (a distinguished clinical professor of neurology) has told me she a perfectly normal girl. …

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