Whites, Hispanics, Asians Grow at Historically Black Colleges

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 27, 2015 | Go to article overview

Whites, Hispanics, Asians Grow at Historically Black Colleges


Established in an era when race limited a young person's options, our nation's collection of historically black colleges and universities will open the doors to students of all races during a unique spring break opportunity coming to Lake County.

Named in honor of the former Lake County coroner and Waukegan police chief and city clerk who died last year, "The Artis Yancey Historically Black Colleges and Universities Tour" kicks off Feb. 3 with a fundraiser in Waukegan in advance of the spring break college tour March 20-28. The trip, which is subsidized so that it costs each student $500, will take Lake County students for visits to a dozen campuses in Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina, as well as attractions in Washington, D.C.

"We want to give an opportunity to students to visit and consider a historically black colleges and universities' education," says Cheryl Dunlap, special events manager for Waukegan Township, which is sponsoring the program.

Yancey was instrumental in starting the spring break tour program last year, Dunlap says. Yancey had advocated for the colleges since his days running track at Waukegan East High School under legendary coach Marvin Arrington, a graduate of Alcorn State University in Lorman, Mississippi.

The next information meeting will be at 6 p.m. Feb. 10 at Park Place, 414 S. Lewis Ave., Waukegan. For information about the schools, the trip or the fundraiser, phone (847) 244-4900, visit waukegantownship.com or email tsprings@waukegantownship.com.

Originally defined by The Higher Education Act of 1965 as "any historically black college or university that was established prior to 1964, whose principal mission was, and is, the education of black Americans," the 105 historically black colleges and universities are seeing more white, Hispanic and Asian students among the more than 300,000 undergraduate and graduate students spread across 20 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

At one of the colleges, Bluefield State College in Bluefield, West Virginia, just 199 of the 1,935 students enrolled in 2012 were black, a smaller percentage than at Harvard University, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. At St. Philip's College, located on Martin Luther King Drive in San Antonio, Texas, Hispanics made up 52 percent, whites accounted for 30 percent and blacks made up just 12 percent of the students in 2013. …

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