Work Advice: Smartphones and the Slipperly Slope of Lost Privacy-BYLN- by Karla L. Miller the Washington Post

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 1, 2015 | Go to article overview

Work Advice: Smartphones and the Slipperly Slope of Lost Privacy-BYLN- by Karla L. Miller the Washington Post


Work Advice: Smartphones and the slipperly slope of lost privacy

Q: I am a federal employee. Our agency is deploying smartphones to replace our BlackBerry devices. The new phones have a GPS feature that cannot be disabled. HR says the agency wants to be able to find the phone if it is lost, but that will only work if the phone is turned on. We are told that we will not be tracked in our off-hours.

As a professional, I want to have a link to my email in off-hours, but I do not think it is the agency's business where I am. Do we have any recourse if our location data are used in some way against us? Do we have a right to know what they are doing with this information?

A: The convenience of an employer-issued mobile phone (or laptop or car) comes at a price: Your employer generally has a right to know where its property is and how it's being used. This doesn't mean you have no reasonable right to privacy, but there's no fixed legal border yet between your employer's right to protect its business interests and your rights as a private citizen.

To get a sense of where that border lies, ask for a written copy of your agency's smartphone policy, specifically how it applies its "no off-hours tracking" rule: Does it actually disable your GPS outside normal business hours, whatever those are? Or does it leave the GPS running but treat location data collected off the clock as off-limits for disciplinary purposes?

In some lawsuits against private-sector employers that tracked employees' off-hours activities via GPS, federal and state courts have indicated that employers' tracking should be reasonable in scope and based on legitimate work-related grounds, according to Elaine Fitch of Kalijarvi, Chuzi, Newman & Fitch. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Work Advice: Smartphones and the Slipperly Slope of Lost Privacy-BYLN- by Karla L. Miller the Washington Post
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.