Surprises with Vegetables, Hot or Frosty

Sunset, November 1985 | Go to article overview

Surprises with Vegetables, Hot or Frosty


Glorious fall vegetables can add colorful surprises to Thanksgiving dinner. With the turkey so easy to roast (see page 128), you'll have time to be creative with the vegetables. The fall harvest offers a cornucopia of choices.

While the turkey occupies the oven, use the freezer to make icy-cold vegetable sorbets, and use the barbecue to grill vegetables, giving them a light smoky flavor.

Cold or hot (or in between), these two ways with vegetables provide many dishes you can weave as bright accents through your Thanksgiving dinner and other fall meals. Start off with a cool vegetable sorbet, hot grilled vegetables in soup, or tepid grilled vegetables in a salad.

Surround the turkey with a wreath of hot or room-temperature grilled vegetables and include cups of frosty sorbet; or follow the turkey with a cleansing sorbet to ease the way to dessert.

Recipes for grilled vegetables in soup and salad start on page 204. Directions for beet, carrot, celery, cucumer, and red bell pepper sorbets starts on page 206.

Vegetable sorbets--Cold and frosty

Although sorbets require several hours to freeze, preparation is easy--just combine vegetables and seasonings in a blender.

Freezing sorbets. Pour vegetables puree into an 8- to 9-inch pan. Cover airtight and freeze at 0[deg.] or colder until solid, at least 5 hours; it can then be stored as long as 4 weeks.

To serve, let sorbet stand at room temperature 15 to 20 minutes to soften slightly, then, with a heavy spoon, break into chunks. Whirl chunks in a food processor or beat with an electric mixer (start slowly, then beat faster as mixture softens) until a thick icy slush forms.

Or you can freeze the vegetable puree in a self-refrigerated ice cream machine, following the manufacturer's directions.

Vegetable sorbets have the best texture when softly frozen--just after they are beaten into slush. At this point, they can be held in the freezer up to 20 minutes until serving. If stored longer, cover; let sorbet stand at room temperature until you can break it up with a spoon. If desired, you can whirl or beat the sorbet again. Because sorbets melt quickly, serve in small cups or in the containers suggested with each recipe.

Tomatillo Salsa Sorbet

First-course options include serving tart and chili-warm tomatillo sorbet in halves of avocados or in small cups to go with hot or cold shrimp. About 1 pound tomatillos, papery husks removed Water 1 fresh or canned jalapeno chili, stem and seeds removed 1/4 cup fresh cilantro (coriander) leaves Salt and pepper

If desired, remove skins from the tomatillos: bring about 3 quarts water to a boil in a 4- to 5-quart pan; immerse tomatillos, a few at a time, in boiling water for 15 to 30 seconds; core and pull off skins.

Puree cored tomatillos (peeled or unpeeled) with chili and cilantro in a blender or food processor. Season puree to taste with salt and pepper. Freeze according to preceding directions. Makes 1-1/2 to 2 cups; allow 1/4 to 1/3 cup per serving.

Tomato Cocktail Sorbet

Present in slender glasses garnished with celery stalks; serve as first course or after the turkey. It also goes well with scrambled eggs and sausages for breakfast. Water 1-3/4 to 2 pounds ripe tomatoes (or 2 cups tomato juice) 1-1/2 teasponss Worcestershire 1/i teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon celery salt 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon liquid hot pepper seasoning Salt and pepper

Bring about 4 quarts water to a boil in a 5- to 6-quart pan. Immerse tomatoes, a few at a time, in boiling water for 15 to 30 seconds. Core tomatoes and pull off skins. Cut tomatoes in half horizontally and gently squeeze out seeds; discard seeds. Puree tomatoes in a blender or food processor, adding Worcestershire, cumin, celery salt, and liquid hot pepper. Season puree to taste with salt and pepper. Freeze according to preceding directions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Surprises with Vegetables, Hot or Frosty
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.