Vampire CHILDREN the; Hooked on iPads and Mobiles Late into the Night, They Hardly Sleep. Here Experts Reveal the Terrifying Toll on the Generation Dubbed. ..I Can Be O until 3a Screens S Burn and on Social Networks Am. I Look at the So Much My Eyes D I Get Headaches

Daily Mail (London), February 5, 2015 | Go to article overview

Vampire CHILDREN the; Hooked on iPads and Mobiles Late into the Night, They Hardly Sleep. Here Experts Reveal the Terrifying Toll on the Generation Dubbed. ..I Can Be O until 3a Screens S Burn and on Social Networks Am. I Look at the So Much My Eyes D I Get Headaches


Byline: Tanith Carey

THE bedside clock was blinking 2am when Jennifer McFall woke from a deep sleep, needing to visit the loo. In an attempt not to wake her two children, Charlie, ten, and Emmie, eight, she tiptoed through the darkened house.

As she passed her son's room, however, she spied the familiar blue glow from his computer tablet coming through the crack in his door. 'I popped my head around and there was Charlie engrossed in a YouTube clip about the game Minecraft, even though he had to get up for school just five hours later.

'I asked him what on earth he thought he was doing and he insisted he'd just woken up and turned it on.' Yet the bags under Charlie's eyes, his grey, almost vampire-like pallor and filthy mood at breakfast the next morning told a different story.

Worryingly, Charlie is among a growing generation of children who are getting a fraction of the sleep they need due to their addiction to the internet.

This is having a serious impact on their health, behaviour and school performance.

The average teenager gets just seven-anda-half hours' sleep a night, despite needing eight to ten hours.

Of course, children wanting to stay up late is not a new phenomenon. But the innocent days of torches concealed under blankets as they read Enid Blyton and comics are long gone.

Thanks to the advent of video clips, games and social media, which can be viewed at any hour on hand-held devices easily hidden from their parents' view, children have never had more opportunity to avoid sleep.

Three million children, aged eight to 15, own an internet-enabled smartphone. On TURN TO NEXT PAGE FROM PREVIOUS PAGE top of that, one in three aged five to 15 has their own tablet. Two-thirds of secondary pupils take these gadgets to bed, according to the charity Tablets for Schools.

According to the Sleep Foundation, as many as 65 per cent of children are estimated to suffer from significant sleep deprivation. As many as two million also have sleep disorders, including insomnia.

By the time these children are in their teens, using smartphones and tablets into the early hours has become so established that it has its own name: 'vamping', named after the adolescent vampires who never sleep in the Twilight books and films.

Indeed, staying up all night has become 'cool' with children competing and egging each other on over social media.

Scroll through the social media feeds on Twitter in the early hours and you will find them strewn with dozens of 'selfies' of blearyeyed teens taken in darkened bedrooms, advertising the fact that they are still awake to their fellow night owls, with hashtags such as 'up all night'.

Social researcher Danah Boyd, author of the book It's Complicated: The Social Lives Of Networked Teens, says young people would rather be chronically tired and resort to subterfuge than give up what they regard as 'me time' late at night.

With back-to-back scheduled activities throughout the day, Boyd says they view the quiet hours after lights out as the only time they have to hold intimate conversations away from prying adult eyes.

The fallout is such that by the time they have left school, they are sleeping one-and-a-half hours less a day than teenagers their age a decade ago.

Girls are more likely to be sucked into this time vacuum than boys, according to studies, because they feel a more compulsive need to use social networks.

FOLLOWING her discovery of Charlie's late-night technology habit a year ago, Jennifer, a 33-year-old, divorced health care assistant from Bristol, says that she's been in a war of attrition with her young son.

Worried that he was getting as little as half the recommended ten hours of sleep for a boy his age, she confiscated his tablet and put it on top of a kitchen cupboard only for Charlie to creep out of bed after lights out, climb onto the kitchen worktop and retrieve it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Vampire CHILDREN the; Hooked on iPads and Mobiles Late into the Night, They Hardly Sleep. Here Experts Reveal the Terrifying Toll on the Generation Dubbed. ..I Can Be O until 3a Screens S Burn and on Social Networks Am. I Look at the So Much My Eyes D I Get Headaches
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.