Faces of War: The Untold Story of Edward Steichen's WWII Photographers

By Ames, Drew | America in WWII, August 2009 | Go to article overview

Faces of War: The Untold Story of Edward Steichen's WWII Photographers


Ames, Drew, America in WWII


Faces of War: The Untold Story of Edward Steichen's WWII Photographers, by Mark D. Faram, Berkley, 240 pages, $29.95.

Faces of War initially reads like a fictional adventure story. An accomplished professional volunteers to join the US Navy and form a unit of specialists who buck navy bureaucracy to perform a mission that only they can fulfill. But the story is true.

Edward Steichen was an established and famous photographer prior to the outbreak of World War II. At age 62, he convinced the navy to take him on as an officer and allow him to form a small unit that would document the navy's aerial forces. The photos Steichen's unit produced are famous, but little has been published about the photographers. Faces of War tells the story of how Steichen became a naval officer, how he recruited his unit, and how his men went from covering stateside training to covering actual battle. In the process, author Mark Faram tells the stories of some of the most famous images to emerge from World War II.

Steichen took a circuitous path to commanding the Navy Aviation Photographic Unit. He was born in Luxembourg in 1879, but moved to Michigan with his family at an early age. He discovered a talent for art as a teenager and in 1895 began experimenting with photography. Over the next two decades he gained fame as both a painter and a photographer. When America entered World War I, the 36-year-old Steichen joined the army, despite being initially rejected as too old. He worked as a photographer in the Army Air Service and ended the war as a lieutenant colonel.

After the Great War, Steichen worked as a commercial photographer specializing in portrait and fashion photography for magazines such as Vogue and Vanity Fair. With the outbreak of World War II, he again tried to join the armed forces to document the war in photos, but was again turned down for being too old. Faram explains how Steichen used his contacts in the publishing world to get a foot in the door with the navy, with the initial mission of photographing naval aviation training as an aid to that training. He then built a small team of experienced and promising photographers.

Steichen's photographers would not have been so successful without high-ranking support that coerced navy bureaucracy to accept all but one of Steichen's recruits as commissioned officers at a time when all navy photographers were enlisted men. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Faces of War: The Untold Story of Edward Steichen's WWII Photographers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.