Black History, Women's History Month Events at Schaumburg Library

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 10, 2015 | Go to article overview

Black History, Women's History Month Events at Schaumburg Library


The late Nelson Mandela said, "For to be free is not merely to cast off one's chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others." He would know. Despite beatings, imprisonment and threats to himself and loved ones, he persevered, achieving human rights successes that proved the merit of his philosophy.

Roughly 100 years prior, Susan B. Anthony, outspoken social reformer and anti-slavery activist, said, "Trust me, that as I ignore all law to help the slave, so will I ignore it all to protect an enslaved woman."

The attitudes and actions of these two historical game-changers and others who risked everything for rights which should have been inherent, are celebrated at the Schaumburg Township District Library during Black History Month in February and Women's History Month in March. All are invited to the following programs, which are sure to be as enlightening as they are entertaining.

To honor important African-American people and events, the library welcomes adults to hear stories of risky, ingenious escapes that led slaves to freedom, while children can have fun and learn with an African stage show. Historical novelist Doug

Peterson will present "A Thousand Miles to Freedom" from 7-8:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 16, in the Rasmussen South Room on the central library's second floor. His Underground Railroad stories will include Henry "Box" Brown, who mailed himself to freedom in a wooden box.

He will also share the tale of William and Ellen Craft, who escaped by Ellen posing as a white man, while her husband pretended to be her slave. Peterson recounts both compelling stories in his books, "The Vanishing Woman" and "The Disappearing Man," which will be available for purchase and signing following his presentation. …

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