The Other Great Migration: The Movement of Rural African Americans to Houston, 1900-1941

By Gritter, Elizabeth | The Journal of Southern History, February 2015 | Go to article overview

The Other Great Migration: The Movement of Rural African Americans to Houston, 1900-1941


Gritter, Elizabeth, The Journal of Southern History


The Other Great Migration: The Movement of Rural African Americans to Houston, 1900-1941. By Bernadette Pruitt. Sam Rayburn Series on Rural Life. (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2013. Pp. [xxiv], 453. $40.00, ISBN 978-1-60344-948-9.)

Bernadette Pruitt provides a very well-researched, well-written, and well-analyzed account of black migration to Houston, Texas, from rural areas between 1900 and 1941. She personalizes the experiences by giving accounts of individuals and families, and she shows how these stories relate to later advancements for civil rights. Her nuanced study also puts the spotlight on Houston, an underrecognized city in the field of southern studies.

Pruitt examines four waves of migration and deftly connects them to larger developments in U.S. history: the 1900s through early 1910s, when new industries attracted African Americans to Houston; the World War I years, when wartime economic needs led to new opportunities; the post-- World War I era through 1930, when African Americans saw the city as a place for improved work and educational opportunities; and the 1930s, when African Americans traveled between the city and country to find employment during this time of economic depression. In fact, her study not only makes a valuable contribution to research but also provides numerous case studies that could be used for teaching these periods.

Drawing from oral histories (including her own family's story), newspapers, government documents, photographs, and other sources, she relates the experiences of African Americans to well-known aspects of southern history such as Jim Crow segregation, but she also shows the uniqueness of Houston by, for instance, mentioning how a motley assortment of migrants, including those from Mexico, tie into the story. She is to be commended as well for incorporating cultural history into her account, given that scholars of the black freedom struggle, with myself as no exception, too often underestimate its significance. She discusses how the Harlem Renaissance extended to Houston by examining jazz musicians and artists who hailed from the Bayou City. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Other Great Migration: The Movement of Rural African Americans to Houston, 1900-1941
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.