Memory Loss Is Not an Automatic Result of Aging

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 14, 2015 | Go to article overview

Memory Loss Is Not an Automatic Result of Aging


Byline: Metro Creative

No one, regardless of age, is immune to random bouts of memory loss. While misplaced car keys or forgetting items on your grocery list are nothing to get worked up over, many men and women 50 and older do start to worry about memory lapses, especially when they start to occur with more frequency than they might have just a few years ago.

But while memory loss might be quickly associated with aging, increased forgetfulness is not an inevitable side effect of getting older, a fact that those at or approaching retirement age should find comforting.

When considering the relationship between memory and aging, it's important that men and women recognize the distinction between memory lapses and dementia, as the two are not one and the same.

As a person ages, his or her hippocampus, the region of the brain involved in the formation and retrieval of memories, often deteriorates. This can affect how long it takes to learn and recall information. But just because this process is slower does not mean it's a warning sign of dementia, which is the loss of certain mental functions, including memory.

Though taking longer to recall information can be frustrating, many people still retain their ability to recall information. In addition, while dementia brought on by conditions such as Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease is untreatable, there are things men and women can do to strengthen their memories and reduce their momentary lapses in memory.

* Start playing games. Games that test the mind have long been believed to benefit the brain, though some remain skeptical about the true impact of brain games.

However, a University of Iowa study funded by the National Institute on Aging found that brain games may in fact pay numerous and long-term dividends. In the study, 681 healthy volunteers over the age of 40 were divided into four groups. One group played computerized crossword puzzles, and three other groups played a brain training video game from Posit Science designed specifically to enhance the speed and accuracy of visual processing. The volunteers showed less decline in visual processing as well as in other tests that measured concentration, memory and the ability to shift quickly between tasks, and the benefits from the training games lasted as long as seven years after training. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Memory Loss Is Not an Automatic Result of Aging
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.