Learning How to Travel without Breaking the Bank

By Stouse, Dennis | The Florida Times Union, January 13, 2015 | Go to article overview

Learning How to Travel without Breaking the Bank


Stouse, Dennis, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Dennis Stouse

Does this sound familiar to you?

At a bookstore, you gravitate to the travel section and peruse the guidebooks. Maps fascinate you and you plot imaginary trips to exotic locales. The Travel Channel is one of your must-see television channels.

Or, perhaps you are just interested in learning more about what travel opportunities exist for those of us who are a bit seasoned in our years and beyond the days of backpacking across Europe and couch surfing.

If you fit this description, then you are a travel aficionado, and this column is for you. Why?

I share your interest in travel, and I will show you ways to indulge in your fascination without breaking the bank. Over the years I have learned how to go where I want to go and see what I want to see, all on a budget.

Why should I be your guide? First of all, I am 65 and travel frequently to destinations within the United States and around the globe. I have learned the ropes of travel and would like to share what I have learned.

I have been afflicted with wanderlust since I was a boy growing up in Kansas City, Mo., in the 1950s and '60s. I would help my father plan our family vacations. Los Angeles was a favorite driving destination because his parents and siblings lived in the Southern California mecca.

We would spend hours poring over maps and charting routes west. Each summer we would select a different route. Would it be a northerly one ... roughly following the old Oregon Trail and then dropping down to the Great Salt Lake and continuing through Nevada to L.A.? Or would we head south through the Texas Panhandle and the deserts and Indian reservations of the Southwest? Perhaps we would we take a central route: Head west straight on U.S. 40 across the plains of Kansas through the Rockies and then over to Las Vegas south to the golden metropolis.

Those were the days of the classic U.S. transcontinental highways such as Route 66 and the Lincoln Highway. …

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