Trans-Pacific Partnership to Facilitate U.S.-China Merger: According to Some Political Pundits, a Main Reason for U.S. Interest in Passing the Trans-Pacific Partnership Is to Inhibit China's Economic Dominance, but That's Far from the Truth

By Gomez, Christian | The New American, February 2, 2015 | Go to article overview

Trans-Pacific Partnership to Facilitate U.S.-China Merger: According to Some Political Pundits, a Main Reason for U.S. Interest in Passing the Trans-Pacific Partnership Is to Inhibit China's Economic Dominance, but That's Far from the Truth


Gomez, Christian, The New American


The American political scene will soon be exploding in a new war over so-called free trade agreements that could make the battle over NAFTA (the North American Free Trade Agreement) in the early 1990s seem but a scruffy scuffle by comparison. The two major fronts in this war are the Atlantic theater, where our policy elites are attempting to merge the United States and the European Union--economically and politically --via the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), and the Pacific theater, where the same elites are trying to merge us with the Pacific Rim countries--economically and politically--through the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

Economic Battle Against China?

We will be focusing here on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which, most likely, will be the first of the two to see action in the U.S. Congress. But, unlike many of this magazine's previous articles on the TPP, we will not be focusing so much on the content of the TPP agreement as on a very deceptive tactical feint its proponents are employing to disarm potential opposition. Here is the deception: TPP proponents know that a large American constituency is already very alarmed over the outsourcing of jobs and industry to China and the huge inroads that China is making into the American economy. So TPP advocates are telling this concerned audience that the TPP--which, at present, does not include China--will give American workers and companies a big new advantage against competition from China. However, these same TPP proponents are duplicitously telling other audiences that China will probably be admitted into the TPP and that, at any rate, the final game plan is to have the TPP subsumed into the larger planned Free Trade Area of the Asia Pacific (FTAAP), which will include not only Communist China, but Russia as well. As we will show below, the architects of the TPP have planned from the beginning to include China and openly acknowledge that the TPP is merely a "steppingstone" (their term) to U.S.-China convergence in the larger FTAAP.

An October 10, 2014 article published in the Diplomat online reported: "China is open to joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a high-ranking Chinese official indicated on Wednesday at a think-tank in Washington, DC." When asked if China would be interested in joining the TPP, Zhu Guangyao, China's vice minister of finance and a member of the Communist Party of China since 1987, replied that "China was 'very open' to the global economy and plans to continue its decades-long process of 'reform and opening up' under Xi Jinping," according to the Diplomat. In the same article, the Diplomat further reported: "China's Commerce Ministry indicated that it was looking more seriously at the possibility of China joining the TPP."

On November 12, reporting on the 2014 Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, held in China, China Daily, the Communist Party of China's state-run newspaper, stated that China's goal is to "counter the growing trend of fragmentation in the region that directly undermines economic integration, not the TPP or any other specific freetrade agreement." China admits that it is not working to counter the TPP, but rather "the growing trend offragmentation in the region." (Emphasis added.) Behind all the Leninist newspeak, "fragmentation" can be understood to mean the independence of nations. China wants greater economic integration for the Asia Pacific region, which means replacing independence with interdependence.

Addressing APEC leaders at the summit, Chinese President and General Secretary of the Communist Party of China Xi Jinping said, "The world economic recovery still faces many unpredictable and destabilizing factors. We need to intensify regional economic integration and foster an open environment that is conducive to long-term development."

It is important to note that Xi Jinping and his American counterparts are using the term "integration" in the same way and with the same meaning as the architects of the European Union. …

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