'My Fame DOES MY FRIENDS' HEADS IN' as Coronation Street's Sinead Tinker Remains Critically Injured in Hospital, Actress Katie McGlynn, 21, Tells Us Why She's Now Living for the Moment, Making Her Grandad Proud, and Having No Time for Boyfriends

The People (London, England), March 8, 2015 | Go to article overview

'My Fame DOES MY FRIENDS' HEADS IN' as Coronation Street's Sinead Tinker Remains Critically Injured in Hospital, Actress Katie McGlynn, 21, Tells Us Why She's Now Living for the Moment, Making Her Grandad Proud, and Having No Time for Boyfriends


Byline: WORDS: sophia charalambous

While most 21-year-olds fill the streets of Manchester weighed down with Primark shopping bags or dance the night away in the city's trendiest bars, Coronation Street star Katie McGlynn, who plays Sinead Tinker, appears to be different. Behind the long blonde hair and lashes, Katie is a self-confessed grafter - she left school and clinched her first acting role as Scout in BBC1's Waterloo Road at just 17.

'I don't know if it's because I started working young, but I feel older than I am,' Katie tells Love Sunday. 'I generally get on with people who are a lot older than me, maybe because I've been around adults on set.'

Katie, who's flown the nest and lives by herself in the centre of Manchester, arrived on the cobbles just 18 months ago, but she's already been handed a huge storyline in the soap. Workers at Underworld were left in a state of shock earlier this year when their minibus crashed on the way to an awards ceremony, leaving Katie's character Sinead critically injured in hospital. The storyline has made Katie reassess her own life.

'I've always been a live-for-the-moment person, because I know life is short, and this has just intensified that,' she explains. 'There are a lot of young people I know who have died over the past couple of years through different illnesses, and it does make you think. I've stopped taking things for granted and enjoy life.'

Thankfully, the closest the Rochdale-born actress has ever come to death in reality is slightly less terrifying than her character's horrifying ordeal.

'It was on holiday a few years ago. I was starving and I ate this piece of meat from a buffet,' she explains. 'It had lots of fat on it and it got caught in my throat and I couldn't breathe. My ex boyfriend had to hit me on the back and the meat shot across the room and landed by some people eating I don't think they were impressed.'

Katie's deadpan sense of humour is witty and refined, but although she may give off the impression she's wiser than her 21 years, she slips up when talking about her homelife.

'OK, my bedroom's a mess, I'm not going to lie,' she giggles. 'I try to keep it tidy, but a few days go by and it's a mess again.'

It's lucky she has her Corrie cast mates on hand to help her keep her scripts in order, because filming skips between different weeks.

'I'm always asking Lisa George (Beth Sutherland, Sinead's auntie) for advice, like she's my mum. One day I'll be filming a scene where I'm crying and the next day I'm doing a scene two weeks down the line. How do you organise that?'

Her support network on Corrie doesn't stop there either - she's made good friends with a lot of the cast. 'I'm really close to Tisha Merry (Steph Britton), Antony Cotton (Sean Tully) and Hayley Tamaddon (Andrea Beckett). I like being around them, because they understand the job and the attention it brings, unlike my home friends.'

Since joining Corrie, sociable Katie can't go anywhere without causing a stir. And sometimes she wishes she could live like a normal 21 year old every now and again.

'There are so many times when I'm out with my friends and I get asked for photos; I feel like I'm doing their heads in,' she says. …

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'My Fame DOES MY FRIENDS' HEADS IN' as Coronation Street's Sinead Tinker Remains Critically Injured in Hospital, Actress Katie McGlynn, 21, Tells Us Why She's Now Living for the Moment, Making Her Grandad Proud, and Having No Time for Boyfriends
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