Ageism and Sexism 'End Women's Careers at 45' Firms Accused of Failing to Recruit, Train and Promote Them

Daily Mail (London), March 10, 2015 | Go to article overview

Ageism and Sexism 'End Women's Careers at 45' Firms Accused of Failing to Recruit, Train and Promote Them


Byline: Louise Eccles Business Correspondent

A DOUBLE dose of ageism and sexism effectively ends women's careers at the age of 45, a major report will say tomorrow.

The Government-backed research found that firms write off mature female staff by failing to recruit, train and promote them.

Men also face age discrimination, but their career progression apparently ends a decade later than women - at around 55.

The study by the Government's older workers' champion, Ros Altmann, questioned HR executives, employees and bosses.

She uncovered damning evidence that women who have barely reached middle age are being passed over for better-paid roles because they were deemed to be 'past it'.

Workers with young bosses face the worst discrimination, as do those who are increasingly required to have IT skills, including knowledge of social media.

Dr Altmann said many employers wrongly assume that older staff who are less familiar with computer technology will not be able to learn, and fail to train them, leaving them lagging behind.

Women faced an extra layer of discrimination from employers who want young, female staff who 'look a certain way', she added.

The damning report will say: 'Promotion prospects for older women are limited - talent progression for them stops around age 45.

'For men it is said to be around age 55. After that, the attitudes in the workplace usually change.' Dr Altmann told the Mail it was wrong to write someone off just because off their age.

She added: 'This should be as unacceptable as deciding not to promote or train them for career progression because of their race. It is pure discrimination.

'Many women and men are reaching their prime in their fifties, and are certainly not past it.

'Unfortunately, workplace attitudes as still so ageist and this urgently needs to change.' The report singled out the television industry as a prime example, claiming that older women are 'far less likely to be retained as main newsreaders or presenters'. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Ageism and Sexism 'End Women's Careers at 45' Firms Accused of Failing to Recruit, Train and Promote Them
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.