Bibliography: The Philosophy of Internal Relations

By Ollman, Bertell | Capital & Class, February 2015 | Go to article overview

Bibliography: The Philosophy of Internal Relations


Ollman, Bertell, Capital & Class


Introduction

This bibliography is divided into three parts: 1) works that deal with or use Marx's philosophy of internal relations; 2) works that present non-Marxist versions of this philosophy; and 3) criticisms of the philosophy of internal relations. There is no pretension of having listed all the writers and works that could appear under these headings. Rather, our aim has been to give readers some idea of the amount, range and quality of the existing literature on this subject, and to encourage them to explore it further.

Authors who have written a lot on the philosophy of internal relations are represented here by only one or two of their works. In Part 1, those whose works are particularly useful also have one star (*), and my personal favourites (which is not to say 1 completely agree with them, or they with me) have two stars before their names. Despite the 'interdisciplinary' nature of our subject, I have also listed writers' academic disciplines after their names, in order to help readers locate content that may be of special interest to them.

Another qualification is that some writers who have only flirted with Marx's philosophy of internal relations (whether they use the label or not), and/or who have been partly critical of it, have been included in Part 1 if I thought that what they said and the overall effect of their work contributes to a better understanding of this philosophy. Still, accepting too many such works would scramble my focus and detract from the usefulness of this bibliography, and this is something I also had to keep in mind. If, in walking this uneven line, I have left out anyone who believes they should have been included or included anyone who believes they don't belong here--and I am sure there are cases of both--I offer my apologies, and also my assurances that all suggestions for additions and corrections to what follows will be very much appreciated.

To avoid another possible misunderstanding, let me point out that this bibliography is not meant to cover all the important work that has been done on dialectics. A great deal of material that is well worth reading on this subject has been omitted, whether because it doesn't use the internal relations approach, or doesn't use enough of it, or doesn't use it in a way that furthers readers' understanding of it. Finally, for the time being, only works in English, including English translations of foreign works, are included.

The bibliography ends with a brief 'Pedagogical Appendix' of works that are particularly useful for teaching dialectics to newcomers.

Readers interested in a quick route into my version of the philosophy of internal relations, which gives equal weight to Marx's process of abstraction, should consult the following, in this order:

1. 'Putting dialectics to work', Dance of the Dialectic, ch. 5.

2. 'Marx's use of "class'", Social and Sexual Revolution (or the problem of the elastic meanings of Marx's concepts, which brought me to his philosophy of internal relations).

3. 'How to study class consciousness ... and why we should', Dialectical Investigations (or how to construct a dialectical subject for dialectical research).

Versions of these and other related pieces also appear on my website, .

Marx's philosophy of internal relations

* Albritton R (Pol. Sci.) Economics Transformed: Discovering the Brilliance of Marx (2007).

* Arthur CJ (Phil.) Dialectics of Labour: Marx and His Relation to Hegel (1986); The New Dialectic and Marx's Capital (2002).

* Badeen D (Pol. Sci.) A Marxist critique of the ontological foundations of neo-classical economics. Ph.D. dissertation (2011).

* Baronov D (Soc.) The Jena Chair (forthcoming).

* Basseches M (Psych.) Dialectical Thinking and Adult Development (1984); The development of dialectical thinking as an approach to integration. …

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