Yard in Dock on 14 Abuse Cover-Ups; Corruption Probe over Decades of VIP Sex Crimes

Daily Mail (London), March 17, 2015 | Go to article overview

Yard in Dock on 14 Abuse Cover-Ups; Corruption Probe over Decades of VIP Sex Crimes


Byline: Chris Greenwood Crime Correspondent

SCOTLAND Yard stands accused of orchestrating an astonishing 14 cover-ups of VIP child sex abuse.

Over 35 years, officers are said to have protected 'untouchable' figures by shutting down inquiries that reached the heart of government.

The 14 alleged paedophilia cover-ups were referred to watchdogs by the Metropolitan Police Service yesterday. It threatens to be the biggest investigation into police corruption since the 1970s.

Hailed as a 'momentous milestone' by one MP, the probe could lead to five former Met chiefs being interviewed. But campaigners are angry that the Met will remain in charge of the investigation.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission insists it will closely monitor their work. The watchdog said the inquiries were 'closely linked and well under way' and it made no sense to start again.

The complex web of allegations was uncovered by detectives probing claims of historical sex abuse first raised by Labour MP Tom Watson in October 2012.

Those on the inquiry, known as Operation Fairbank, are understood to have raised concerns after studying files kept Turn to Page 6 Continued from Page One in storage. They have also been faced with horrifying allegations from child victims that their complaints were ignored or covered up. The claims include one that police deliberately stalled their inquiries into the Elm Guest House, in Barnes, south-west London, leaving dozens of boys to be abused. Victims claim that high-profile politicians, diplomats and civil servants visited the property to abuse boys in the 1970s and 1980s.

Officers are also accused of releasing paedophile MP Cyril Smith without charge after he was caught in an undercover operation at a sex party involving teenage boys.

Police are also accused of failing to end sex parties at the now notorious Dolphin Square complex, in Pimlico, central London, following the intervention of 'prominent people'.

It is claimed that members of a wealthy and powerful elite believed they were 'untouchable' after police were warned off shutting down the sordid activities. One senior figure under the spotlight is former Tory home secretary William Whitelaw, who is accused of demanding that police drop an inquiry into a paedophile ring.

The politician, one of Margaret Thatcher's closest allies, is suspected of quashing a year-long investigation into a gang accused of abusing 40 children.

Other inquiries focus on claims that the names of high-profile sex attackers were removed from witness statements and that police deliberately let senior politicians off the hook. One inquiry is examining allegations that Special Branch seized a dossier naming 16 MPs and peers handed to an investigative journalist by a former Labour minister. …

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