Using Additional Literacy Time and Variety of Reading Programs

By Camahalan, Faye Marsha G.; Wyraz, Amanda | Reading Improvement, Spring 2015 | Go to article overview

Using Additional Literacy Time and Variety of Reading Programs


Camahalan, Faye Marsha G., Wyraz, Amanda, Reading Improvement


The purpose of this project was to find out if additional literacy time and using a variety programs such as Burst, Daily 5 and other teacher-initiated reading activities were beneficial to struggling readers. The time frame of this intervention was over five lessons that focused on the needs of four students. The lessons targeted the improvement of phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. The study describes the account of teacher-researchers on how the reading activities were used as formative assessments to monitor the progress of students. The summative assessments used were Dibels Oral Reading Fluency (DORF), and passage reading to show how the students improved in fluency. After reading the passage, students answered questions to demonstrate reading comprehension.

Background of the Study

According to Vaughn, Wanzek and Murray (2012), children who received daily instruction in addition to the normal classroom instruction will help students to do better. This teacher research project focused on helping students to improve on their reading skills. The classroom for this study was a third grade special education in a school with high poverty and move in rate. The school requires each classroom to do a ninety minute literacy block each day. This means that there is a thirty minute time blocked out for each grade level. During this time called Burst (Amplify Education, 2013), all reading teachers, special education teachers, assistants and the English Language Learner teacher go into the classrooms to help struggling readers with smaller groups. Each classroom has three adults for instructional assistance. This allows for an instructional design for three small groups to learn simultaneously based on ability level. During this time the Burst reading program is being used for instruction. It is a scripted program that is tailored to the needs of each student in a group. After conducting the additional variety of reading programs, the three teacher assistants leave the classroom and the classroom teacher is left with his or her regular sixty minute literature block. For the students who receive additional instruction and support, they receive an additional half hour of intervention in the classroom. This means that the students with an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) receive one hundred twenty minutes of reading instruction on a daily basis. With this being the classroom scenario, we investigated the effects of the additional literacy time in relation to their reading level. Four struggling readers were selected for this study. Based on their previous scores in reading assessments, they are currently in the red on their Text, Reading and Comprehension (TRC) and their Dynamic Indicators Basic Early Literacy Skills (Dibels) testing. The objective of this study was to see what growth will be seen through using the Daily 5, Burst reading and the various intervention programs that we have been working with them on. We used Florida Center for Reading Research (FCRR) (Florida State University, 2004) as a resource for the intervention lessons using a thirty minute additional literacy time.

Literature

According to Coleman and Vaughn (2000), once a student falls behind, it will be hard to catch up. It is hard to catch up, no matter what is used. There are many different reasons why students struggle in reading. They stated that students with emotional, behavioral disorders (EBD) demonstrate reading difficulties that is linked to their behavior disorders. This link that is demonstrated here shows that disabilities and reading issues go together. The additional time that is provided to the students at my school site can help all of them.

Additional instructional time will not help the kids benefit from if it does not come from blocked amount of time (Allington, 2001). The additional time that is provided to students needs to meet the needs of students. According to Cooper, Chard and Kiger (2006), proper interventions need to be used and for this to happen it needs to come off the needs of the students to help them learn. …

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