Bailey, Janies P.: Rethinking Poverty: Income, Assets, and the Catholic Social Justice Tradition

By Quirk, Patrick | The Review of Metaphysics, March 2015 | Go to article overview

Bailey, Janies P.: Rethinking Poverty: Income, Assets, and the Catholic Social Justice Tradition


Quirk, Patrick, The Review of Metaphysics


BAILEY, Janies P. Rethinking Poverty: Income, Assets, and the Catholic Social Justice Tradition. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2010. 176 pp. Paper, $30.00--This book seeks to redress the lack of emphasis on the idea of asset building as a means of poverty relief in current debates. Professor Bailey's main thesis is that there is too much attention paid to income inequality at the expense of the lost tradition of "asset development for the poor."

Since the Catholic Church teaches that economics a not a value-neutral science, Bailey's approach is first to ask why we need asset building for the poor and then to introduce the major concepts of Catholic social thought in relation to property, ownership, asset-building policy, and the common good. Chapter two traces a line of thought that extends from Pope Leo XIII's stress on the virtues of ownership through Pius IX's affirmation that "private property is consistent with the natural law and that ownership implies both individual and social rights and responsibilities." He goes on to discuss, perhaps too briefly, John XXIII's and Paul VI's development of a global vision and rounds out the chapter with John Paul II's seminal social encyclicals (Labomm Exercens, Sollicitudo Rei Socialis, and Centesimus Annus) as well as that pontiffs concern for the partial redefinition of ownership in an information age.

Chapter three is entitled "Assets and Human Capabilities" and begins with a quote from Martha Nussbaum's Frontiers of Justice. At this point, the author sets forth a "complementary conception" of social justice by using Nussbaum's "capabilities approach" and her "thick, vague" theory of the good. A helpful table defines the "Capabilities for a Good Human Life" by using quotations from Nussbaum's work. The chapter then draws on the work of Michael Sherridan, whose inductive approach to measuring economic health seeks to place public policy at the center of an asset-building approach to poverty relief. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Bailey, Janies P.: Rethinking Poverty: Income, Assets, and the Catholic Social Justice Tradition
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.