LeBar, Mark. the Value of Living Well

By McAleer, Sean | The Review of Metaphysics, March 2015 | Go to article overview

LeBar, Mark. the Value of Living Well


McAleer, Sean, The Review of Metaphysics


LEBAR, Mark. The Value of Living Well. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. xiii + 356 pp. Cloth, $74.00--Eudaimonism typically concerns the content of moral reasons, holding that our reasons for action ultimately refer to living well. This fine book seeks to draw on eudaimonism to address questions about the nature of reasons and values and thus begins a welcome foray into metaethics. Its core normative commitment, argued for in part one, is telic monism, the view that we have one ultimate end. Its core metaethical commitments, argued for in part two, are constructivism and particularism. Part three addresses concerns arising from and objections to positions taken in the first two parts.

Virtue Eudaimonism (VE) is grounded in our being end-seekers and end-setters. We cannot make sense of ourselves as agents, LeBar argues, unless we accept that we have one ultimate end--a final end that derives none of its value or normative force from other ends and is itself the source of the value of all other ends. This telic monism is captured by The Aristotelian Framework," which is the scaffolding upon which Virtue Eudaimonism hangs." It comprises five claims: that we have ends; that some of these ends are final ends (that is, ends whose normative force is not derived entirely from their instrumental relations to other ends); that there is at least one ultimate end (that is, a final end that derives none of its normative force from other ends); that this ultimate end contributes normative force to all other ends; and that there is at most one ultimate end. Telic monism is consistent with value pluralism. But if there were more than one ultimate end, a decision to pursue one rather than another would be arbitrary, and genuine agency rules out such arbitrariness. That there is one ultimate end doesn't tell us what the ultimate end is. Of course, for the eudaimonist, that end is living well, and excellent practical agency--practical wisdom--is central to living well. Eudaimonia and practical wisdom are mutually informing"; neither is theoretically basic.

Practical rationality is not a matter of recognizing and responding to independently existing values and norms. Since such recognitionalist understandings render reason essentially passive, they are at odds with genuine agency. Moreover, they have difficulty explaining how normative facts can guide action. VE is constructivist: normative facts are constructed by practical reason. Though normative facts are constructed, LeBar takes his view to be realist, since for him the distinctive feature of realism is that moral judgments are representational; stance-independence is not decisive in his taxonomy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

LeBar, Mark. the Value of Living Well
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.