Chapter 1: The Expanding Role of Online Video in Teaching, Learning, and Research

By DeCesare, Julie A. | Library Technology Reports, February-March 2014 | Go to article overview

Chapter 1: The Expanding Role of Online Video in Teaching, Learning, and Research


DeCesare, Julie A., Library Technology Reports


Abstract

Chapter 1 of Library Technology Reports (vol. 50, no. 2), "Streaming Video Resources for Teaching, Learning and Research," will explain who is using online video and why it is important for information professionals to know how to find and use it in library instruction and research education. Recent surveys and research about online video, as well as some literature on the literacies surrounding video, will be covered. The chapter also includes some tips and tricks for viewing online video and best practices for using popular search engines in the search for online video.

Introduction: Why Online Video?

In less than ten years, the availability of digitally converted or born-digital media, especially video, has grown exponentially. Libraries and librarians are constantly navigating, and helping their patrons navigate, this digital shift. Online and streaming video has saturated the consumer market for popular television shows and movies, and the market is fragmented. My first full-time job was as a video store clerk. I had those shelves memorized, and I can remember when DVDs were introduced to reluctant patrons and staff. I still haven't been able to part with the impressive VHS collection I acquired during that job! Now I find I am still drawn to visual formats, but instead of memorizing shelves, I am constantly on the lookout for online video resources that can benefit my patrons or colleagues. Collecting and accessing videos and media has always been complicated for librarians--fair use limitations and allowances, individual versus institutional rights, closed-circuit rights, public performance rights, streaming rights, and other questions of licensing, copyright, and access, make this area murky. Navigating the availability of titles and needed formats is also complicated. This report will cover many video resources, available for free and for fee, that are ideal for use in library instruction, research education and outreach, curriculum, and embedding into content and learning management systems.

The scope of this report will be mostly consumption: searching for, viewing, sharing, and embedding online video in teaching, learning, and research.

Why Is Online Video Important, and to Whom?

To start, let's think about how nontextual resources are being used in higher education. Ithaka's S + R US Faculty Survey 2012 provides an overview of faculty research and teaching behaviors. In the report, video, film, and nontextual resources are at the same level of importance to faculty research as textual reference materials such as encyclopedias. (1) Video is a great supplemental resource for faculty, but it is also becoming more and more important in their primary scholarly research--especially as more and more special collections and archives digitize their audiovisual holdings.

In the survey, faculty members were asked how important film and video resources are to their scholarly research. Close to 40 percent of humanities faculty responded that these materials were very important; in social sciences, the response was less than 20 percent; and for the sciences, about 10 percent considered these materials very important. (2)

In terms of teaching, faculty members use video and film for both lower- and upper-level undergraduate assignments. When asked about the types of materials used in their assignments for lower- and upper-level undergraduates, the disciplines varied again. Film, video, artwork, and other nontextual sources were used often or occasionally with lower-level undergraduates by close to 85 percent of humanities faculty; in the social sciences, about 70 percent; and in the sciences, about 35 percent. (3) For upper-level undergraduate assignments, humanities led with a little over 80 percent using nontextual sources often or occasionally; social sciences, about 58 percent; and sciences, about 30 percent. (4)

In terms of the higher education community, the need for and use of the material vary depending on how faculty will be using them--for their own scholarship, or for the teaching, learning, and research of different communities. …

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