Thinking Is Thrilling

By Lawson, Mark | New Statesman (1996), March 6, 2015 | Go to article overview

Thinking Is Thrilling


Lawson, Mark, New Statesman (1996)


Man and Superman

Lyttelton Theatre, London SE1

The Absence of War

Sheffield Crucible and on UK tour

One measure of impact is whether writers bestow an adjective: Shakespearean, Chekhovian, Brechtian or Pinteresque. George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), a contrary type, is immortalised fittingly by a term that does not quite contain his name. "Shavian" drama, which turns on ideological debate, remains a powerful theatrical "life force" (an important concept for the playwright) three-quarters of a century after his death.

Tom Stoppard's latest play, The Hard Problem, which sets rationalists against the religious, is very much a Shaw thing, and David Hare (who challenges adjectival memorial--Harite? Hairy?) repeatedly sets two viewpoints in passionate opposition, as in his 1993 play about Labour Party politics, The Absence of War. A revival of the Hare at the same time as a new National Theatre production of Shaw's 1903 drama, Man and Superman, offers an intriguing conjunction of Shavian and neo-Shavian plays.

Man and Superman borrows its title from Nietzsche's concept of the Ubermensch and its plot from Mozart's Don Giovanni, but flips the sexual dynamics so that Shaw's hero, Jack Tanner, is a nervous and virginal man at the mercy of attempted ensnarement by a woman. Unusually, because it takes almost five hours to perform its four acts, Man and Superman exists in two versions. A three-act anti-romantic comedy featuring Jack and Ann, intermittently done as a West End star vehicle, omits the fantastical "Don Juan in Hell" sequence, in which Jack, kidnapped by brigands on a motoring holiday in Spain, dreams he has become Mozart's hero and is debating with Satan.

Simon Godwin's production attempts the entire text, but trims it to a relatively Beckettian three and a half hours and moves it to a sort of modern day, in which there is one mobile phone but a left-wing writer has a uniformed chauffeur. Judiciously cut, the non-romcom scenes are still funny enough but the optional debate in Hades proves unmissable: a soaring forum of ideas about evolution, revolution and religion in which Jack/Juan's long, linguistically and philosophically twisty arias are answered with wry one-liners from the Devil, tremendously portrayed by Tim McMullan as a slippery, Wildean wit. …

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